critical thinking

Observe an Expert Scientist

Baby1

Happy Baby Scientist and his sister

As you learn the process of science, wouldn't it be great to be able to watch expert scientists at work? By watching the way they approached new problems, tested ideas, and revised their views based on the evidence they collected, you could improve your understanding of how science works.

Magnetic Lines?

Open any book or web page that talks about magnets, and you will probably see a drawing that shows magnetic lines of force that extend from one end of the magnet to the other.

Are there really lines of magnetic force as they show in the drawings? Well, lets find out.

Feeling the Pressure

This experiment comes from a suggestion made by B. Eschner. It started with his observations as he washed a plastic bag. It developed into a demonstration of water pressure, which then turned into a wonderful explanation of why things float. The more I played with it; the more I liked it. I hope you will have as much fun (and learn as much) as I did.

Feeling a Point (or two)

How do you feel? No, I don't mean are you happy or sad? Touch the back of your hand. Did you feel it? How? When you touched your hand, you pressed on nerves in your skin. These nerves reacted and sent a message to your brain, telling you that something touched your hand. Some parts of your skin have more nerves than others. We are going to examine how these nerves are arranged, and see how that can affect the message that your brain gets.

Egg in a Bottle

This experiment is a classic. If I had to pick the one science experiment that I have seen in the most science books, this now would be it. But it is also a very misunderstood demonstration. You will find that even many books of science experiments get the explanation for this one wrong.

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