engineering

AM/FM Radio Waves

This week's experiment comes from a question that I received about which is better, AM or FM radio. As we shall see, the answer depends on what properties you are basing your answer on. As we will see, each has advantages and disadvantages.

An Easy Swing?

I have taught several classes on Amusement Park Physics, and I usually include several activities on the carnival type games. Those games often use science, making something look simple and easy, when it is actually difficult to do. This activity is based on a carnival game where you try to swing a weight on a string and knock over a bottle.

Newton's Third Law of Motion

This experiment comes from my hotel room. I was traveling do some consulting for a science museum, and was sitting at the desk, thinking of ideas for experiments. As I sat, I swiveled back and forth in the chair. As I swung back and forth, I decided that it would make an interesting experiment.

A Cup of Cold

This experiment comes from some research I am doing on "Science With Your Refrigerator," but it has its roots in my childhood. You may recognize some of your childhood too.

Air Space

There are only two more days before we head for New Zealand. I am looking forward to the farm, the beach, seeing friends, and the food. It will be a LONG flight, but I am even looking forward to that. Most of my packing is done, and I am down to the "what did I forget" stage.

Pinhole Eyeglasses

This experiment is something that I ran into MANY years ago when I first began wearing glasses. If you wear glasses, then you know how challenging it can be to find your glasses if you have laid them down and can't remember where you put them. You need your glasses to find your glasses. This is a way that you can make a quick, emergency pair of glasses for yourself or someone else that needs them.

Building a Rain Gauge, part 2

Back to part 1

What Does a Rain Gauge Really Tell Us?

Now that we know the proper shape and location for a rain gauge, lets take a look at what they can tell us, and why they are important.

Lets start by imagining that you put a rain gauge in your yard. After a rain, you find that there is one inch of rain in your rain gauge. We can use that to calculate how much rain fell on your yard.

Pages