Quest: 5th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Standards for Grades 2-5 to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



I used a Density Column to show that olives are denser than cherry tomatoes. To follow proper scientific procedure, the experiment needs to be checked by repetition and replication. What is the difference between repetition and replication?

  1. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that other people do exactly the same experiment again.

    Yes! To confirm your results it is important for you to repeat exactly the same experiment again (repetition) and then for other people to do exactly the same experiment again. (replication). If any of the results from repetition or replication are different from your original data, your original results are NOT confirmed, and you need to do more work.
  2. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that I do the experiment again after correcting errors.

    No. Replication is when other people to do exactly the same experiment.
  3. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that other people try to improve on my experiment.

    No. Replication is when other people to do exactly the same experiment.
  4. Repetition means that I do the experiment again after correcting errors.. Replication means that other people do exactly the same experiment again.

    No. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.N.1.4 Explain how particular scientific investigations should yield similar conclusions when repeated.

SC.5.N.1.3: Recognize and explain the need for repeated experimental trials.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.5.N.2.2 Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

As we look at the rock cycle, we can see that heat and pressure can change a sedimentary rock into a metamorphic rock. What would change a metamorphic rock into a sedimentary rock?

  1. More heat and pressure

    No. More heat and pressure would cause more metamorphic change.
  2. Erosion and deposition

    Yes. If the rock was eroded and deposited, that would form a sedimentary rock.
  3. Melting and cooling

    No. Melting the rock and then cooling it would produce an igneous rock.
  4. A metamorphic rock cannot become a sedimentary rock

    No. In the rock cycle, a rock from any group (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic) can be changed into a rock from any group.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Which of these sources of electricity is a renewable resource?

  1. Coal

    No. Coal is the fossilized remains of ancient plants, and it takes millions of years to form.
  2. Hydroelectric

    Yes. The lake water that provides hydroelectric power is replenished every time it rains.
  3. Natural Gas

    No. Natural Gas is a fossil fuel, and takes millions of years to form.
  4. Fuel Oil

    No. Fuel oil comes from petroleum, which requires extremely long periods of time to form.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.3 Recognize that humans need resources found on Earth and that these are either renewable or nonrenewable.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.3.a Describe specific examples of how humans have changed the capacity of an environment to support specific life forms (e.g., people create wetlands and nesting boxes that increase the number and range of wood ducks, acid rain damages amphibian eggs and reduces population of frogs, clear cutting forests affects squirrel populations, suburban sprawl reduces mule deer winter range thus decreasing numbers of deer).

NGSS


4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

MS-ESS3-1 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Review Energy-1 practice

These flowers are so long and thin that only hummingbirds can get to the nectar. What would be the advantage of only letting certain creatures get the nectar?

  1. It makes it more likely that the flower will be pollinated.

    Yes! As you can see in the Flowers video, the flower needs a pollinator to carry its pollen to another flower of the same kind. If only hummingbirds can get to the nectar, they are more likely to visit other flowers of the same kind. By doing that, they carry pollen from one flower to another, pollenating them. That makes this a strong advantage for the plant.
  2. It keeps animals from eating the nectar.

    No. The nectar is supposed to be eaten. It serves as a treat to get animals to come to the flower.
  3. It helps the hummingbirds get more food.

    No. While getting more food would be an advantage for the hummingbirds, it would not help the plant.
  4. There is no advantage.

    No. Flowers have specific shapes, colors, and smells for a reason.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.5.L.15.1 Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.

SC.7.L.15.3 Explore the scientific theory of evolution by relating how the inability of a species to adapt within a changing environment may contribute to the extinction of that species.

Utah


UT.4.V.2.b Cite examples of physical features that allow particular plants and animals to live in specific environments (e.g., duck has webbed feet, cactus has waxy coating).
Hunting with an Umbrella video, ClosedCaptions
A Walk in the Park video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

UT.5.V.2.c Describe how a particular physical attribute may provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not in another (e.g., heavy fur in arctic climates keep animals warm whereas in hot desert climates it would cause overheating; flippers on such animals as sea lions and seals provide excellent swimming structures in the water but become clumsy and awkward on land; cacti retain the right amount of water in arid regions but would develop root rot in a more temperate region; fish gills have the ability to absorb oxygen in water but not on land).

UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.a Predict why certain traits (e.g., structure of teeth, body structure, coloration) are more likely to offer an advantage for survival of an organism.

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

I poured some water on this rock. Later that day, the water was all gone. What happened to it?

  1. It evaporated.

    Yes. When liquid water turns into water vapor, the process is called evaporation. That is what happened to the water on the rock.
  2. It sublimated.

    No. Sublimation is when a solid turns directly into a gas. Dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) is an example of sublimation. The solid changes directly into carbon dioxide gas, without becoming a liquid.
  3. It condensed.

    No. Condensation is when a gas turns into a liquid. The drops of water that form on the outside of a glass of ice is the result of condensation.
  4. It precipitated.

    No. In weather, precipitation is when solid or liquid water falls from the clouds. Rain, snow, and sleet are examples of precipitation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.9.1 Describe the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling by using familiar scientific terms such as melting, freezing, boiling, evaporation, and condensation.

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Utah


UT.4.I.2.a Locate examples of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle (e.g., water evaporates when heated and clouds or dew forms when vapor is cooled).
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, free, ClosedCaptions
The Water Cycle video
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions
A Cool Experiment text page
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, free, ClosedCaptions
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.