Quest: 8th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Grade Standards to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



Cannonball Jelly fish are excellent swimmers, and Portly Spider Crabs often hitch a ride on them. What type of relationship is that?

  1. mutualism

    No. In mutualism, both organisms benefit. The jellyfish gets no benefit from the crab's hitchhiking.
  2. commensalism

    Yes. In commensalism, one organism (the crab) benefits, and the other (jellyfish) is not affected. The crab gets free transportation, and the jellyfish is not helped or harmed.
  3. parasitism

    No. For parasitism, one organism benefits, and the other is harmed. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish is harmed by this relationship.
  4. predation

    No. In predation, one organism eats another. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish gets eaten in this relationship.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.L.17.2 Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms such as mutualism, predation, parasitism, competition, and commensalism.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

NGSS


MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

Which part of the food web do these termites belong to?

  1. Producer.

    No. A producer captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. To do that, the organism needs to contain chlorophyll.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    No. Primary consumers eat producers. Termites do not eat live plants.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. This butterfly does not eat animals.
  4. Decomposer

    Yes! Termites are one of the few animals that can digest the cellulose from dead wood, thanks to special bacteria that live inside them. That makes termites very important as decomposers, but it also means that they can be a problem when we build things from wood.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Measuring Photosynthesis video, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

This is called Obsidian. It is formed from molten lava that cools so quickly that it forms a natural glass instead of crystals. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    Yes! Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. This is an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. This is not a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. Instead of being changed, this got hot enough to completely melt, so it is not metamorphic.
  4. Obsidian is not a rock.

    No. Obsidian is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Obsidian is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Continuous Change video, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Reading the Rocks: Law of Superposition video
Reading the Rocks: Law of Crosscutting video
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Reading the Rocks: The Present is the Key to the Past video, ClosedCaptions
Paleo Cookies video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Geologic Time-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Geologic Time-2 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Geologic Time-3 practice

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

This magnet attracts the compass and the magnetized needle without having to come in contact with them. This is an example of a force acting at a distance.

Which of the following is another example of a force that acts at a distance without actual contact?

  1. Wind turning a windmill.

    No. The moving air is pushing against the blades of the windmill. Because a physical object (moving air) is pushing on the windmill, this is a contact force.
  2. Sound causing you to hear something.

    No. For you to hear a sound, the vibrations of the object make the air vibrate. That is a contact force because there is direct contact between the vibrating object and the air. The vibrating air is in contact with your ear drum, causing it to vibrate too. That lets you hear the sound. Because a physical object (vibrating air) is moving your ear drum, this is a contact force.
  3. Gravity causing a rock to fall.

    Yes. The gravitational attraction between the Earth and the rock does not need physical contact. The rock would fall, even if it was in a total vacuum, with no physical object to push or pull on it. This is a force acting at a distance.
  4. Throwing a ball to knock over a target

    No. To throw the ball, your arm pushes against it. Your arm moving the ball is a contact force. The moving ball hits the target to knock it over. The ball is touching the target to knock it over, so this is also a contact force.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.10.3 Investigate and explain that an electrically-charged object can attract an uncharged object and can either attract or repel another charged object without any contact between the objects.

>>> Teacher Page: Electrostatic Charges


SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

Utah


UT.3.IV.2.c Pose questions about gravity and forces.

NGSS


MS-PS3-2 Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

Rainbows are produced by:

  1. Refraction

    Partly correct. Light entering the raindrop is reflected off of the back surface.
  2. Reflection

    Partly correct. As the light passes from air to water, and from water to air, the light is bent or refracted. Different colors are refracted different amounts, separating the colors.
  3. Both reflection and refraction

    Correct! When you see a rainbow, the sun will always be behind you. (There are other, similar looking phenomena which you see when facing the sun, but they are not rainbows.) The sunlight enters each raindrop, is refracted (bent). Different colors are refracted different amounts. When the light hits the far side of the raindrop, part of it goes on through, and part of it is reflected back towards the sun (and towards you.) As it passes leaves the drop, the difference in density from water to air refracts (bends) the light even more, separating the colors into bands for the rainbow.
  4. Neither reflection no refraction

    No. One or both take part in producing the rainbow.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Looking for Rainbows video
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Onion Crystals video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

SC.8.E.5.11 Identify and compare characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum such as wavelength, frequency, use, and hazards and recognize its application to an understanding of planetary images and satellite photographs.
Sunprints video
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
CD Spectrum text page
Review Light-3 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.e Demonstrate how white light can be separated into the visible color spectrum.
White Balance video
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-3 practice

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Sunprints video
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.