Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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These building stones are made of a rock called coquina. The rock is almost entirely made up of pieces of fossil sea shells. What kind of rock is it?

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. That would have melted and destroyed the fossil shells. This is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. These bits of shell were deposited by water, so coquina is a Sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Coquina has not been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock, so it is not metamorphic.
  4. Coquina is not a rock.

    No. Coquina is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Coquina is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, free
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The light area on the left side of this photo is the Milky Way. What is the Milky Way?

  1. A constellation.

    No. The Milky Way contains many more stars than a constellation.
  2. A solar system.

    No. A solar system only has one star, not a huge number of stars.
  3. A galaxy.

    Yes! Our solar system is part of the Milky Way galaxy. When we lived in the city, the lights made it difficult to see the Milky Way. Now that we live far from city lights, it is amazingly easy to see.
  4. A universe.

    No. The Milky Way is only a small part of the entire universe.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.1 Recognize that a galaxy consists of gas, dust, and many stars, including any objects orbiting the stars. Identify our home galaxy as the Milky Way.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-1 practice
Review Space-10 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, free, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.IV.1.c Compare the size of the Solar System to the size of the Milky Way galaxy.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

Which of these sources of electricity is a renewable resource?

  1. Coal

    No. Coal is the fossilized remains of ancient plants, and it takes millions of years to form.
  2. Hydroelectric

    Yes. The lake water that provides hydroelectric power is replenished every time it rains.
  3. Natural Gas

    No. Natural Gas is a fossil fuel, and takes millions of years to form.
  4. Fuel Oil

    No. Fuel oil comes from petroleum, which requires extremely long periods of time to form.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.3 Recognize that humans need resources found on Earth and that these are either renewable or nonrenewable.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.3.a Describe specific examples of how humans have changed the capacity of an environment to support specific life forms (e.g., people create wetlands and nesting boxes that increase the number and range of wood ducks, acid rain damages amphibian eggs and reduces population of frogs, clear cutting forests affects squirrel populations, suburban sprawl reduces mule deer winter range thus decreasing numbers of deer).

NGSS


4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

MS-ESS3-1 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Review Energy-1 practice

One test for identifying minerals involves rubbing the mineral on a rough tile, and looking at the color of the mark it leaves. This test is called:

  1. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is when a mineral breaks along planes of weakness to form flat surfaces.
  2. Hardness

    No. Hardness is the resistance of a mineral to being scratched by other substances.
  3. Fracture

    No. Fracture is when a mineral breaks but does not show cleavage.
  4. Streak

    Yes. The streak test examines the color of the mineral when it is powdered by rubbing it on a rough tile or streak plate. While the actual color of a mineral can vary, it will always produce the same color streak.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, free
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice

Utah


UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
Definition of a Mineral video, free
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice

NGSS

Which of these is NOT an example of a renewable energy source?

  1. Wood

    No. Because we can grow more trees, wood is a renewable energy source.
  2. Coal

    Yes. It takes millions of years for coal to form, so it is not considered a renewable energy source.
  3. Hydroelectric power

    No. Thanks to the water cycle, water is added to the lake above the dam, making this a renewable energy source.
  4. Wind energy

    No. Wind energy is constantly renewed by uneven heating of the Earth.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.3 Recognize that humans need resources found on Earth and that these are either renewable or nonrenewable.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

Utah

NGSS


4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.