senses

Hear the Ocean

Have you ever been told that you can hear the ocean when you put a seashell to your ear? If you have tried it, you probably heard something that sounded like the ocean. What did you really hear?

Waterfall Effect

This is an illusion that surprised me the first time I saw it. I was visiting a beautiful waterfall in Tennessee, and had never heard of the Waterfall Effect. The results were quite surprising and delightful.

Feeling the Pressure

This experiment comes from a suggestion made by B. Eschner. It started with his observations as he washed a plastic bag. It developed into a demonstration of water pressure, which then turned into a wonderful explanation of why things float. The more I played with it; the more I liked it. I hope you will have as much fun (and learn as much) as I did.

Feeling Sound Waves

This experiment is one that I have noticed while doing my electricity shows. I use a balloon in the show to demonstrate positive and negative static charges. While holding this balloon, I noticed that I could feel a variety of sounds, especially when I was using a microphone and loud speaker.

Feeling a Point (or two)

How do you feel? No, I don't mean are you happy or sad? Touch the back of your hand. Did you feel it? How? When you touched your hand, you pressed on nerves in your skin. These nerves reacted and sent a message to your brain, telling you that something touched your hand. Some parts of your skin have more nerves than others. We are going to examine how these nerves are arranged, and see how that can affect the message that your brain gets.

The Importance of Observation

Observation is a very important part of science. It lets us see the results of an experiment, even if they are not the results we expect. It lets us see unexpected things around us that might stimulate our curiosity, leading to new experiments. Even more important than observation is accurate observation. Often, our eyes and our brains play tricks on us, letting us see what we expect to see, instead of what is actually there.

Eclipse Watching


A photo I took during a partial eclipse.

Solar eclipses are fairly rare, so it is always a treat to be able to observe one. The main challenge is to find a way to see the eclipse, without damaging your eyes. While there are special filters that let you watch an eclipse, there is also a very safe, very simple way to observe it with materials that you probably already have.

You will need:

Cool Water

This experiment comes from washing the dishes. If you look around this site, you will find that a fair number of my experiments have come from washing dishes, which is probably the result of the state my mind is in when my belly is stuffed with yummy food.

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