Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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What is the function of the fluffy, white part of the milkweed seed?

  1. It protects the seed from insects.

    No. Insects could easily eat the seed, even with the fluffy top.
  2. It helps hide the seeds from birds.

    No. The white fluff actually makes it easier for birds to find the seeds, but the moving air from their wings also helps spread the seeds.
  3. It gathers pollen.

    No. The seed has already been pollinated before the fluff develops.
  4. It causes the wind to spread the seeds.

    Yes! The fluffy part of the seed acts like a parachute to let the seeds blow long distances with the wind. This spreads the plant's seeds over a large area.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice

Which of the following statements is scientifically testable?

  1. These alligators are scary.

    No. Being scary is not a physical property. Instead, it is an opinion. Some people might think they are scary, while other people might think they are not.
  2. These alligators have sharp teeth.

    Yes! Careful observation would show that all three of these alligators have very sharp teeth. Anyone who put their hand into the mouth of these alligators would find out quickly that sharp teeth are a measurable, physical property that is scientifically testable.

    Remember that scientifically testable properties are going to be the same, no matter who tests them. For example, these alligators each have four legs, scaly skin, and lungs for breathing air. They are carnivorous, which means that they eat other animals. They are reptiles, and they lay eggs.

    All of that information is based on physical evidence that can be checked and verified. You could count their legs, examine their skin, etc. These things are scientifically testable.

    On the other hand, opinions are a property of the observer, not the object. I may think alligators are interesting. Someone else may thing they are scary, or ugly, or boring. You could test different people, to see if they think alligators are scary, but you can't test the alligator to see if it is scary. Opinions are not scientific evidence about the object.

  3. These alligators have ugly eyes.

    No. Again, this is an opinion, not a measurable, physical property. I happen to think that alligators have pretty eyes.
  4. These alligators are lazy.

    No. Lazy is not a measurable property. I might call them lazy, but you might think that they are just waiting for something tasty to walk by. Lazy is an opinion, and is not scientifically testable.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.2.1 Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

SC.8.N.2.1 Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific ideas.

Utah

NGSS

I poured some water on this rock. Later that day, the water was all gone. What happened to it?

  1. It evaporated.

    Yes. When liquid water turns into water vapor, the process is called evaporation. That is what happened to the water on the rock.
  2. It sublimated.

    No. Sublimation is when a solid turns directly into a gas. Dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) is an example of sublimation. The solid changes directly into carbon dioxide gas, without becoming a liquid.
  3. It condensed.

    No. Condensation is when a gas turns into a liquid. The drops of water that form on the outside of a glass of ice is the result of condensation.
  4. It precipitated.

    No. In weather, precipitation is when solid or liquid water falls from the clouds. Rain, snow, and sleet are examples of precipitation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.9.1 Describe the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling by using familiar scientific terms such as melting, freezing, boiling, evaporation, and condensation.

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Utah


UT.4.I.2.a Locate examples of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle (e.g., water evaporates when heated and clouds or dew forms when vapor is cooled).
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, free, ClosedCaptions
The Water Cycle video
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions
A Cool Experiment text page
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, free, ClosedCaptions
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

I placed this plant near the window. After two hours, I examined it. What would you expect to happen to the leaves during that time?

  1. The leaves will turn towards the light.

    Yes. The leaves will move and turn so that their surface gets as much light as possible. The following is a time lapse video, showing what happened with the plant.

  2. The leaves will turn away from the light.

    No. The leaves need light, so they turn to catch as much light as possible.
  3. The leaves will turn a darker green.

    No. While more light could eventually cause the leaves to grow and darken, the process would not happen in a couple of hours.
  4. The leaves will not change.

    No. Plants are adapted to turn their leaves towards a light source.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.2 Investigate and describe how plants respond to stimuli (heat, light, gravity), such as the way plant stems grow toward light and their roots grow downward in response to gravity.
Review Plants-1 practice

SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.d Investigate and report the response of various organisms to changes in energy (e.g., plant response to light, human response to motion, sound, light, insects’ response to changes in light intensity).

UT.3.II.2.b Predict the effects of changes in the environment (e.g., temperature, light, moisture) on a living organism.

UT.3.V.1.b Observe and report how sunlight affects plant growth.

NGSS


2-LS2-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.

3-LS3-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Cells-4 practice

K-ESS2-2 Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-1 practice

4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Bird Bones video
Feathers video
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Eye Shine text page
Review Plants-8 practice
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

MS-LS1-5 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

This snow fell when the temperature outside was 39°F. How can you get snow when the temperature is above freezing?

  1. The wind made it feel colder, allowing it to snow.

    No. While wind chill can make it feel colder, it does not actually make it colder.
  2. It was colder in the clouds where the snow formed.

    Yes. Even when air temperatures at the surface are above freezing, the clouds can be much colder. If the air at the surface is not too warm, the snow can reach the ground without melting.
  3. Rain froze into snow when it hit the ground.

    No. Freezing rain forms ice, not snow. Light, fluffy snow flakes form as they fall through the air, not after they hit the ground.
  4. This is really hail instead of snow.

    No. Hail is made of large chunks of ice, not tiny flakes.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.7.4 Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation (rain, snow, sleet, and hail), making connections to the weather in a particular place and time.

SC.6.E.7.3 Describe how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, air pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity and precipitation.
Nephoscope video
Review Weather-6 practice

Utah


UT.4.II.2.a Observe and record effects of air temperature on precipitation (e.g., below freezing results in snow, above freezing results in rain).

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, free, ClosedCaptions
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.