water cycle

Melting Icebergs

This week's experiment comes from a report I recently heard on National Public Radio. Unfortunately, I was driving and could not write down the fellow's name, so I could give him proper credit. He was talking about the facts and fictions of global warming. One point that he mentioned was one that I had heard many times and had never thought all the way through. What would happen if the global temperature rose enough for the polar ice caps to melt? All of that extra water would cause worldwide flooding, right? Lets investigate. You will need:

Making a Solar Still

Imagine for a moment that you are stranded in the desert, and running short on water. Or imagine that you are in a boat far out at sea, surrounded by salt water, but no fresh water to drink. Is there any way you could use some science to get something to drink? Of course there is!

915

Lightning in clouds
A normal lightning strike to the ground is the result of the attraction between the negatively charged cloud and the positive charge on the ground below. What causes lightning to strike from one negatively charged cloud to another?

928

Snow on trees
We have already had our first snow of the year. The day it snowed, the low was only 36°F. If the temperature is above freezing, why did the precipitation not fall as rain?

933

Cat in snow
This is our newest cat, Little Bit. He is enjoying his first big snow. Is snow classified as a rock? A mineral? Both? Neither?

941

Cat in snow
Although we have had several days with lots of sun and temperatures up in the 60's, there is still a lot of snow on the ground. Why hasn't it melted away?

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