body covering

Feeling a Point (or two)

How do you feel? No, I don't mean are you happy or sad? Touch the back of your hand. Did you feel it? How? When you touched your hand, you pressed on nerves in your skin. These nerves reacted and sent a message to your brain, telling you that something touched your hand. Some parts of your skin have more nerves than others. We are going to examine how these nerves are arranged, and see how that can affect the message that your brain gets.

Cooling Fans

This experiment came from Diane in South-central Pennsylvania. She and her son were discussing ceiling fans, and how they make you feel cooler. They wanted to know if the fan actually cools the room, or does it just feel that way?

Cool Water

This experiment comes from washing the dishes. If you look around this site, you will find that a fair number of my experiments have come from washing dishes, which is probably the result of the state my mind is in when my belly is stuffed with yummy food.

Thoughts on an Exoskeleton

Tarantula and molt
My Brazilian Salmon Pink Bird-eating Tarantula (Lasiodora parahybana)

My pet tarantula molted this week, which started me thinking about exoskeletons. While we have our skeletons on the inside, other creatures, such as spiders, insects, and crabs wear their skeletons on the outside of their bodies. What would it be like to have your skeleton on the outside instead of the inside?

Fingerprints

Fingerprints are an important part of forensic science, allowing investigators to identify people who have been at a crime scene, or have touched objects. This is a simple way that you can try collecting fingerprints yourself.

305

This little bird was enjoying our feeder today. In spite of their small size, these birds often dive and peck on raccoons, rabbits, squirrels, and even people. Why?

Pages