Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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After I rubbed this ballon against my hair, it stuck to the side of my head. Why?

  1. The balloon stuck because I don't have enough hair.

    No. While much of my hair is gone, I still have enough to do this experiment.
  2. The balloon stuck because the balloon had the same charge as my hair.

    No. Two things with the same electrostatic charge will repel, pushing apart.
  3. The balloon stuck because the balloon had a different charge from my hair.

    Yes. When I rubbed the balloon against my hair, electrons moved from my hair to the balloon. The extra electrons gave the balloon a negative charge, and the missing electrons left my hair with a positive charge. Opposite charges attract, so the balloon stuck to my hair.
  4. The balloon stuck because my hair was magnetized.

    No. Rubbing a balloon against something does not magnetize it. Even if it was magnetized, a magnet would not attract the rubber balloon.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.10.3 Investigate and explain that an electrically-charged object can attract an uncharged object and can either attract or repel another charged object without any contact between the objects.

>>> Teacher Page: Electrostatic Charges


SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

Utah


UT.5.IV.1.c Describe the behavior of objects charged with static electricity in attracting or repelling without touching.

NGSS


MS-PS3-2 Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

The yellow lines show how light is bent as it passes through a magnifying glass. This is an example of:

  1. Absorption

    No. The glass is clear, telling us that very little of the light is being absorbed. Absorption does not bend the light.
  2. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the rays of light go in many different directions.
  3. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light as it moves from one substance to another. As the light passes through the curved lens of the magnifying glass its path is changed, bending the rays towards the focal point.
  4. Reflection

    No. While some light is reflected from the glass, it is not responsible for the bending of the light.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

This snow fell when the temperature outside was 39°F. How can you get snow when the temperature is above freezing?

  1. The wind made it feel colder, allowing it to snow.

    No. While wind chill can make it feel colder, it does not actually make it colder.
  2. It was colder in the clouds where the snow formed.

    Yes. Even when air temperatures at the surface are above freezing, the clouds can be much colder. If the air at the surface is not too warm, the snow can reach the ground without melting.
  3. Rain froze into snow when it hit the ground.

    No. Freezing rain forms ice, not snow. Light, fluffy snow flakes form as they fall through the air, not after they hit the ground.
  4. This is really hail instead of snow.

    No. Hail is made of large chunks of ice, not tiny flakes.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.7.4 Distinguish among the various forms of precipitation (rain, snow, sleet, and hail), making connections to the weather in a particular place and time.

SC.6.E.7.3 Describe how global patterns such as the jet stream and ocean currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, air pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity and precipitation.
Nephoscope video
Review Weather-6 practice

Utah


UT.4.II.2.a Observe and record effects of air temperature on precipitation (e.g., below freezing results in snow, above freezing results in rain).

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

This baby praying mantis looks very much like its mother, but not exactly. What does that tell us about its life cycle?

  1. It does not undergo metamorphosis.

    No. While it does look similar to its parents, it lacks wings and other features which it will have as an adult.
  2. It has incomplete metamorphosis.

    Yes! It has most of the features of an adult, and will gain the final adult features later in its life.
  3. It has complete metamorphosis.

    No. For complete metamorphosis, the larva looks very different from the parent.
  4. It skipped metamorphosis.

    No. While it does look similar to its parents, it lacks wings and other features which it will have as an adult.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Which position would the Moon be in when it is a full moon?

  1. A

    No. This would be a half moon, with the half towards the Sun in light, and the half away from the Sun dark.
  2. B

    No. This would be a new moon. The entire lighted side of the Moon is facing away from the Earth, so the entire side of the Moon that we can see would be dark.
  3. C

    No. This would be a half moon, with the half towards the Sun in light, and the half away from the Sun dark.
  4. D

    Yes! The side of the Moon that is facing the Sun is also facing us. That entire side would be illuminated (unless the alignment was right for a lunar eclipse.)



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.