Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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We enjoy the hummingbirds that visit our feeders. I am trying to find the mixture of sugar and water that they like the best.

Each day, I put out four feeders with different amounts of water and sugar. At the end of each day, I measure to see how much of each the hummingbirds drank. Which of the following is NOT an important part of this experiment?

  1. One of the feeders should only contain water, with no sugar.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. The feeder without any sugar is the control. If the hummingbirds drink just as much pure water, it would indicate that the sugar is not important.
  2. The feeders should be placed randomly every day.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. If you always put the same mixture in the same location, the results may be because the birds like that location instead of because they like the amount of sugar.
  3. I should repeat this experiment every day for several weeks.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. The more times you repeat the same test, the more likely you are to get accurate results.
  4. The different mixtures should be colored different colors with nontoxic food coloring.

    Yes. This is NOT an important part of the experiment. It would add a second variable to the experiment, which is a bad thing. You want everything to be the same for each sample, with the only difference being the amount of sugar. If you used different colors and different amounts of sugar, you would to know whether the results were due to the color or the sugar.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

These cells DO NOT have a cell wall. What does that tell us?

  1. These are young cells.

    No. Even new cells can have a cell wall.
  2. These are NOT plant cells.

    Yes! Plant cells are surrounded by a cell wall, which provides structure and protection.
  3. These are NOT animal cells.

    No. Animal cells do not have a cell wall.
  4. These are dead cells.

    No. Being alive or dead does not change whether a cell has a cell wall or not.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.6.L.14.4 Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Osmosis video
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.1.c Differentiate between plant and animal cells based on cell wall and cell membrane.
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
Osmosis video
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Which part of the food web do these termites belong to?

  1. Producer.

    No. A producer captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. To do that, the organism needs to contain chlorophyll.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    No. Primary consumers eat producers. Termites do not eat live plants.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. This butterfly does not eat animals.
  4. Decomposer

    Yes! Termites are one of the few animals that can digest the cellulose from dead wood, thanks to special bacteria that live inside them. That makes termites very important as decomposers, but it also means that they can be a problem when we build things from wood.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
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Review Food Web-10 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

As we look at the rock cycle, we can see that heat and pressure can change a sedimentary rock into a metamorphic rock. What would change a metamorphic rock into a sedimentary rock?

  1. More heat and pressure

    No. More heat and pressure would cause more metamorphic change.
  2. Erosion and deposition

    Yes. If the rock was eroded and deposited, that would form a sedimentary rock.
  3. Melting and cooling

    No. Melting the rock and then cooling it would produce an igneous rock.
  4. A metamorphic rock cannot become a sedimentary rock

    No. In the rock cycle, a rock from any group (igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic) can be changed into a rock from any group.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
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Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
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Review Rocks-7 practice
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Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Which position would the Moon be in during an eclipse of the Moon?

  1. A

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  2. B

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  3. C

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  4. D

    Yes. In this position, the Moon could be in the Earth's shadow. It does not always pass through the shadow, so we don't have an eclipse every month, but when it does, it will be in this position.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.