Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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When you break the mineral calcite, it breaks into shapes with flat, smooth sides. This is an example of:

  1. Cleavage

    Yes! A mineral has cleavage when it breaks to form flat, smooth surfaces.
  2. Fracture

    No. There are different kinds of fractures, but none of them form flat, smooth surfaces.
  3. Conchoidal

    No. A conchoidal fracture is the shell-shaped break that is commonly seen when glass breaks. A conchoidal fracture is not flat.
  4. Hardness

    No. Hardness tells us how easily a mineral can be scratched, not how it breaks.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

I used this piece of calcite to scratch this penny. Then I used the penny to scratch the piece of calcite. What does that tell us?

  1. It tells us that I did the test wrong.

    No. The test was done correctly.
  2. It tells us that they both have the same hardness.

    Yes! You test the hardness of a mineral by testing to see what will scratch it. If two substances scratch each other, they have the same hardness.
  3. It tells us that calcite is not a mineral.

    No. Scratching a specimen will not tell you if it is a mineral.
  4. It tells us that calcite has cleavage.

    No. You do not test for cleavage by scratching a mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

You have probably seen patterns of light like this in a pool of water. What causes it?

  1. Absorption

    No. If the light was being absorbed, the pattern would be dark instead of bright.
  2. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the entire area brighter, not a specific pattern.
  3. Reflection

    No. While the light has to reflect back to your eye for you to see it, reflection does not cause this pattern.
  4. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light. Waves and ripples on the surface of the water act just like the curved surface of a lens. This bends the light into patterns that have shapes similar to the ripples on the water's surface.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

Which part of the food web does this mushroom fit into?

  1. Producer.

    No. A producer captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. To do that, the organism needs to contain chlorophyll. This mushroom cannot use the energy of sunlight to produce its own food.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    No. Primary consumers eat producers. This mushroom does not eat living plants.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. This mushroom does not eat living animals.
  4. Decomposer

    Yes! Decomposers break down dead and decaying organisms. This mushroom gets its energy from decaying organisms in the soil.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

This is the mineral galena. What type of luster does it have?

  1. Vitreous

    No. A vitreous luster means that the mineral looks glassy. Galena does not look like it is made of glass.
  2. Shiny

    No. Shiny is not a type of luster.
  3. Metallic

    Yes! A metallic luster means that the mineral looks like it is made of metal. Galena reflects light in the same way that a piece of metal does. If a mineral looks like it is made of metal, it has a metallic luster.
  4. Silver

    No. Silver is a color, not a type of luster. Luster is the way that a mineral reflects light, not is color.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.