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Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

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Why does this grasshopper have such small wings?

  1. Because this species does not fly.

    No. This species of grasshopper does fly.
  2. Because it has a mutation.

    No. This is a normal grasshopper, not a mutant.
  3. Because it is a cricket, not a grasshopper.

    No. This is a grasshopper.
  4. Because it is not an adult.

    Yes! Grasshoppers have incomplete metamorphosis. The immature grasshoppers look similar to adults, but have some differences. The immature stages of the grasshopper has small wings, but the adult stage has large, functional wings.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Which of these sources of electricity is a renewable resource?

  1. Coal

    No. Coal is the fossilized remains of ancient plants, and it takes millions of years to form.
  2. Hydroelectric

    Yes. The lake water that provides hydroelectric power is replenished every time it rains.
  3. Natural Gas

    No. Natural Gas is a fossil fuel, and takes millions of years to form.
  4. Fuel Oil

    No. Fuel oil comes from petroleum, which requires extremely long periods of time to form.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.3 Recognize that humans need resources found on Earth and that these are either renewable or nonrenewable.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.3.a Describe specific examples of how humans have changed the capacity of an environment to support specific life forms (e.g., people create wetlands and nesting boxes that increase the number and range of wood ducks, acid rain damages amphibian eggs and reduces population of frogs, clear cutting forests affects squirrel populations, suburban sprawl reduces mule deer winter range thus decreasing numbers of deer).
Investigating Acid Rain video, checked
Quadrats and Population Sampling video, ClosedCaptions
Review Energy-1 practice

NGSS


4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.
Investigating Acid Rain video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

MS-ESS3-1 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how the uneven distributions of Earth’s mineral, energy, and groundwater resources are the result of past and current geoscience processes.
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Energy-1 practice

Incandescent light bulbs use electrical energy to produce light energy, but it is not a direct transformation. Instead, the electrical energy is changed to a different form of energy, and then to light.

Electricity → ? → Light


What form of energy does the "?" represent?

  1. Sound

    No. Electrical energy can be transformed into sound energy, but that would not cause the bulb to light.
  2. Thermal

    Yes. As electrical energy flows through the filament, resistance changes the electrical energy into thermal energy. When the filament gets hot enough, some of the thermal energy is converted into light.
  3. Radiation

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into radiation.
  4. Friction

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into friction.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.10.1 Discuss that people use electricity or other forms of energy to cook their food, cool or warm their homes, and power their cars.
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.5.P.10.4 Investigate and explain that electrical energy can be transformed into heat, light, and sound energy, as well as the energy of motion.
Introduction to the LED video, checked
Light a Bulb with a Balloon video, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.7.P.11.2 Investigate and describe the transformation of energy.
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked
Review Energy-3 practice

Utah


UT.3.V.2.c Predict, measure, and graph the temperature changes produced by a variety of mechanical machines and electrical devices while they are operating.
Review Energy-3 practice

UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked

NGSS


4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Singing Glass video, checked
The Slow Race video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Whistle Stick video, text page, blog, free, checked
Simple Circuits video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
A Grass Whistle video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 1 video, checked
High Bounce video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 2 video, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Why Things Go Bang video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-3 practice

These cells have a cell wall. What does that tell us?

  1. These are young cells.

    No. Even new cells can have a cell wall.
  2. These are plant cells.

    Yes! Plant cells are surrounded by a cell wall, which provides structure and protection.
  3. These are animal cells.

    No. Animal cells do not have a cell wall.
  4. These are dead cells.

    No. Being alive or dead does not change whether a cell has a cell wall or not.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.6.L.14.4 Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.1.c Differentiate between plant and animal cells based on cell wall and cell membrane.
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Cannonball Jelly fish are excellent swimmers, and Portly Spider Crabs often hitch a ride on them. What type of relationship is that?

  1. mutualism

    No. In mutualism, both organisms benefit. The jellyfish gets no benefit from the crab's hitchhiking.
  2. commensalism

    Yes. In commensalism, one organism (the crab) benefits, and the other (jellyfish) is not affected. The crab gets free transportation, and the jellyfish is not helped or harmed.
  3. parasitism

    No. For parasitism, one organism benefits, and the other is harmed. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish is harmed by this relationship.
  4. predation

    No. In predation, one organism eats another. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish gets eaten in this relationship.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.L.17.2 Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms such as mutualism, predation, parasitism, competition, and commensalism.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.