Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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I used this piece of quartz to scratch a piece of glass. What was I testing?

  1. Streak

    No. To test streak, you rub the mineral on a white tile, to see its color when it is powdered.
  2. Fracture

    No. Fracture is one way that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.
  3. Hardness

    Yes. Hardness is measured by scratching other substances, such as your fingernail, copper, and glass. This quartz scratches the glass, which tells us it has a hardness or 5.5 or more. Actually, the hardness of quartz is 7, quite a bit harder than glass.
  4. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is one of the ways that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Incandescent light bulbs use electrical energy to produce light energy, but it is not a direct transformation. Instead, the electrical energy is changed to a different form of energy, and then to light.

Electricity → ? → Light


What form of energy does the "?" represent?

  1. Sound

    No. Electrical energy can be transformed into sound energy, but that would not cause the bulb to light.
  2. Thermal

    Yes. As electrical energy flows through the filament, resistance changes the electrical energy into thermal energy. When the filament gets hot enough, some of the thermal energy is converted into light.
  3. Radiation

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into radiation.
  4. Friction

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into friction.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.10.1 Discuss that people use electricity or other forms of energy to cook their food, cool or warm their homes, and power their cars.
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.5.P.10.4 Investigate and explain that electrical energy can be transformed into heat, light, and sound energy, as well as the energy of motion.
Introduction to the LED video, checked
Light a Bulb with a Balloon video, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.7.P.11.2 Investigate and describe the transformation of energy.
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked
Review Energy-3 practice

Utah


UT.3.V.2.c Predict, measure, and graph the temperature changes produced by a variety of mechanical machines and electrical devices while they are operating.
Review Energy-3 practice

UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked

NGSS


4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
A Grass Whistle video, checked
High Bounce video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 1 video, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Bottle Tones, part 2 video, checked
Why Things Go Bang video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Singing Glass video, checked
The Slow Race video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Whistle Stick video, text page, blog, free, checked
Simple Circuits video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-3 practice

Which of these processes forms the VISIBLE part of a cloud?

  1. Evaporation

    No. Evaporation changes liquid water into water vapor. Water vapor is an invisible gas, so it is not the visible part of the cloud.
  2. Condensation

    Yes! Condensation changes water vapor into droplets of liquid water to form the cloud. These are just like the tiny water droplets that form fog, letting you see the cloud.
  3. Precipitation

    No. Precipitation can fall from a cloud, but it is not the process that forms the cloud.
  4. Convection

    No. Convection carries the water vapor upwards so it can cool and condense, but condensation is what forms the visible part of the cloud.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.9.1 Describe the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling by using familiar scientific terms such as melting, freezing, boiling, evaporation, and condensation.
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Making a Solar Still video
Wonderful Water video, checked
A Watched Pot video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
What Really Happens With Evaporation? text page, free, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.a Locate examples of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle (e.g., water evaporates when heated and clouds or dew forms when vapor is cooled).
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Experiment text page
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

This is a photograph of the Painted Desert in Arizona. These layers of rock have not been folded or overturned, so we know that the layer on the bottom is the oldest. This is based on:

  1. The Law of Superposition

    Yes! The Law of Superposition tells us that unless the layers have been disturbed, they will be in order of their age, with the youngest on the top, and the oldest on the bottom.
  2. The Law of Crosscutting

    No. The Law of Crosscutting tells us that a feature (crack, fault, igneous intrusion, etc.) that cuts through a layer of rock is younger than the layer it cuts through. That makes sense, because the layer would have to be there first, before it could be broken by a fault, etc.
  3. The Law of Relativity

    No. There is a theory of relativity, which deals with the basics of physics, not geology. There is no Law of Relativity.
  4. The Law of Thermodynamics

    No. The Law of Thermodynamics deals with energy, not with layers of rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.
Reading the Rocks: Law of Superposition video
Reading the Rocks: Law of Crosscutting video
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Reading the Rocks: The Present is the Key to the Past video, ClosedCaptions
Paleo Cookies video
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Geologic Time-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Geologic Time-2 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Geologic Time-3 practice

What season is the area that the arrow points to having?

  1. Winter

    No. In winter, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be pointed away from the Sun.
  2. Spring

    No. For spring, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.
  3. Summer

    Yes! Even though that area is experiencing night, the Southern hemisphere is pointed towards the Sun. That means that it gets more direct sunlight and longer days.
  4. Autumn

    No. For autumn, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.1 Observe that the patterns of stars in the sky stay the same although they appear to shift across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

Utah


UT.6.II.2.e Use a model to explain why the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video, checked
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

5-ESS1-2 Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Finding Your Way video, checked
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.