Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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Baking a cake is an example of:

  1. A physical change

    Partly right. Some of the changes involved in baking a cake are physical changes.
  2. A chemical change

    Partly right. Some of the changes involved in baking a cake are chemical changes.
  3. Both

    Yes! The process of baking a cake involves many changes. Some, such as water evaporating and sugar melting are physical changes. Others, such as baking powder reacting cause a change in the chemical formulas, indicating a chemical change. For more on this, read Changing How We Look at Changing
  4. Neither

    No. There are many changes involved in baking a cake.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.9.1 Investigate and describe that many physical and chemical changes are affected by temperature.

SC.8.P.9.2 Differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes.
Changing Colors, part 1 video
Changing Colors, part 2 video
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions
Polymers and Slime video, ClosedCaptions
Silver Pictures video
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions
Changing How We Look at Changing text page, free
Review Matter-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.3.d Compare a physical change to a chemical change.
Changing Colors, part 1 video
Changing Colors, part 2 video
The Chemistry of Milk video, ClosedCaptions
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions
Paper Petals video, ClosedCaptions
Changing How We Look at Changing text page, free
Review Matter-4 practice

UT.8.I.1.a Differentiate between chemical and physical properties.
Cabbage Indicator video
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions
Making Turmeric Paper video
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions
Paper Petals video, ClosedCaptions
Review Matter-4 practice

NGSS


2-PS1-4 Construct an argument with evidence that some changes caused by heating or cooling can be reversed and some cannot.

MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.

Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of ALL mammals?

  1. All mammals have hair.

    No. All mammals DO have hair. Even whales and dolphins have some hair on their skin.
  2. All mammals give birth to live young.

    Yes! While most species of mammals give birth to live young, a few (platypus, echidna) lay eggs.
  3. All mammals have mammary glands.

    No. All mammals DO have mammary glands. In females, these glands can produce milk to feed their young.
  4. All mammals have three bones in their inner ear.

    No. All mammals DO have three bones in their inner ear. These bones are called the malleus, the incus, and the stapes. They transfer vibration from the ear drum to the inner ear.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.
Feathers video
A Walk in the Park video
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

SC.6.L.15.1 Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.3.b Use a simple classification system to classify unfamiliar Utah plants or animals (e.g., fish/amphibians/reptile/bird/mammal, invertebrate/vertebrate, tree/shrub/grass, deciduous/conifers).
A Walk in the Park video
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

UT.7.V.2.c Generalize rules for classification.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

NGSS

When this traffic jam starts moving, the cars will be able to speed up faster than the big trucks. Why?

  1. The cars have more powerful engines.

    No. The trucks have more powerful engines than the cars do.
  2. The cars have tires with more friction.

    No. The truck tires are larger, which means they have more contact with the ground, and more friction.
  3. The cars weigh less.

    Yes! The heavier an object is (the more mass it has), the more force it takes to move it. The trucks weigh a lot more than the cars, so it takes much more energy to get them moving.
  4. The cars are more streamlined

    No. A streamlined shape helps when the cars are moving quickly, but does not do much as they are starting up.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.13.3 Investigate and describe that the more mass an object has, the less effect a given force will have on the object's motion.

Utah


UT.3.III.2.b Compare and chart the relative effects of a force of the same strength on objects of different weight (e.g., the breeze from a fan will move a piece of paper but may not move a piece of cardboard).

NGSS


MS-PS2-2 Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

None of these layers have been turned upside down. Based on the Law of Superposition, which layer is the oldest?

  1. A

    No. Layer A is on top of layer B, so it is younger than layer B. That means that it is not the oldest.
  2. B

    No. If you look at layer B, it is on top of layer C, which means that it is younger than layer C. B is not the oldest.
  3. C

    No. Look closely at the top part of layer C. The top part of layer C is on top of part of layer D. That tells us that layer C is younger than layer D.
  4. D

    Yes! This one is a bit tricky, because of the way the rocks were formed. Layer D formed first, as a flat, horizontal layer. Erosion weathered the left part of D away, forming a sloping hillside. Image the photo with layers A, B, and C erased, and it looks like a sloping hillside.

    Next, a nearby volcano erupted, spewing out lots of volcanic ash. The ash covered the hillside, forming layer C.

    Next, lava from the volcano flowed down over the ash, forming layer B.

    Later, the volcano erupted again, depositing another layer of volcanic ash to form layer A. After that, layer A was covered by another layer of lava, and then another layer of volcanic ash.

    So A is the youngest, followed by B, then C, and D is the oldest.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

When water freezes into ice, its volume increases. What happens to its mass?

  1. It increases.

    No. When water freezes, it takes up more space, but the mass stays the same.
  2. It stays the same.

    Yes. When water freezes, it expands to take up more space, but its mass stays the same. Mass is the measure of how much "stuff" is there. Freezing water does not create new water or add more "stuff". It just makes the water take up more space.
  3. It decreases.

    No. The mass stays the same, even when the water freezes.
  4. Water does not have mass.

    No. Everything that is made out of matter has mass.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.3 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating that the mass of a whole object is always the same as the sum of the masses of its parts.

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter


SC.8.P.9.1 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating and concluding that mass is conserved when substances undergo physical and chemical changes.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.1.b Compare the weight of a specified quantity of matter before and after it undergoes melting or freezing.

UT.7.I.2.a Use appropriate instruments to determine mass and volume of solids and liquids and record data.
Review Matter-2 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-2 Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions
The Difference Between Weight and Mass video
Ice Cream Science video
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions
Air has Weight text page
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.