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Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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I used this piece of calcite to scratch this penny. Then I used the penny to scratch the piece of calcite. What does that tell us?

  1. It tells us that I did the test wrong.

    No. The test was done correctly.
  2. It tells us that they both have the same hardness.

    Yes! You test the hardness of a mineral by testing to see what will scratch it. If two substances scratch each other, they have the same hardness.
  3. It tells us that calcite is not a mineral.

    No. Scratching a specimen will not tell you if it is a mineral.
  4. It tells us that calcite has cleavage.

    No. You do not test for cleavage by scratching a mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice

This limestone is in Middle Tennessee, and contains a wide variety of fossils of ocean creatures. What kind of rock is limestone?

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks are formed from molten lava or magma.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are made up of bits of other rocks that have been deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity. This limestone was deposited by the ocean, making it a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and/or pressure. If this limestone was exposed to tremendous heat and pressure, it could change into a metamorphic rock called marble.
  4. Limestone is not a rock.

    No. Limestone is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. It is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.d Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

UT.8.III.1.c Categorize rock samples as sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice

Why is color not a reliable way to identify minerals?

  1. Many minerals occur in several different colors

    Yes. This is the mineral quartz. Quartz can be clear, white, black, yellow, purple, and other colors, so its color is not reliable for identification.
  2. It is difficult to tell the difference between color and luster.

    No. Luster tells us how the mineral reflects light, and has nothing to do with its color.
  3. Some minerals are clear, and don't have any color.

    No. Even clear minerals like quartz can be found in different colors due to impurities and imperfections.
  4. Actually, color is a good way to identify minerals.

    No. Color is not a reliable way to identify minerals.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice

This is a lichen, which is actually a fungus and an algae living together. As it grows, it produces chemicals which dissolve some of the rock it grows on. This is an example of:

  1. Erosion

    No. Erosion means that the pieces of rocks are being carried away. The lichen is dissolving the rock, but not carrying it away.
  2. Weathering

    Yes! Lichens cause quite a bit of weathering in rocky areas.

  3. Both erosion and weathering

    No. The rock is not being moved, so it is not erosion.
  4. Neither erosion nor weathering

    No. As the lichen dissolves the rock, that is an example of weathering.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Continuous Change video, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.2.b Distinguish between weathering (i.e., wearing down and breaking of rock surfaces) and erosion (i.e., the movement of materials).
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice

UT.5.II.1.a Identify the objects, processes, or forces that weather and erode Earth’s surface (e.g., ice, plants, animals, abrasion, gravity, water, wind)
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Continuous Change video, checked
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice

UT.8.III.2.b Describe the role of energy in the processes that change rock materials over time.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Continuous Change video, checked
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked

NGSS


4-ESS2-1 Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video, checked
Continuous Change video, checked
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong, checked
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice

Why does this grasshopper have such small wings?

  1. Because this species does not fly.

    No. This species of grasshopper does fly.
  2. Because it has a mutation.

    No. This is a normal grasshopper, not a mutant.
  3. Because it is a cricket, not a grasshopper.

    No. This is a grasshopper.
  4. Because it is not an adult.

    Yes! Grasshoppers have incomplete metamorphosis. The immature grasshoppers look similar to adults, but have some differences. The immature stages of the grasshopper has small wings, but the adult stage has large, functional wings.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.