Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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This limestone is in Middle Tennessee, and contains a wide variety of fossils of ocean creatures. What kind of rock is limestone?

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks are formed from molten lava or magma.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are made up of bits of other rocks that have been deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity. This limestone was deposited by the ocean, making it a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and/or pressure. If this limestone was exposed to tremendous heat and pressure, it could change into a metamorphic rock called marble.
  4. Limestone is not a rock.

    No. Limestone is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. It is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.d Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

UT.8.III.1.c Categorize rock samples as sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The light area on the left side of this photo is the Milky Way. What is the Milky Way?

  1. A constellation.

    No. The Milky Way contains many more stars than a constellation.
  2. A solar system.

    No. A solar system only has one star, not a huge number of stars.
  3. A galaxy.

    Yes! Our solar system is part of the Milky Way galaxy. When we lived in the city, the lights made it difficult to see the Milky Way. Now that we live far from city lights, it is amazingly easy to see.
  4. A universe.

    No. The Milky Way is only a small part of the entire universe.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.1 Recognize that a galaxy consists of gas, dust, and many stars, including any objects orbiting the stars. Identify our home galaxy as the Milky Way.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-1 practice
Review Space-10 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, free, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.IV.1.c Compare the size of the Solar System to the size of the Milky Way galaxy.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

This is Halite, also known as table salt. It was formed when ancient seas dried up, leaving layers of salt behind. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. The Halite was not melted, and is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. Halite was deposited in large layers by water, which means that it is a sedimentary rock. Halite is also a mineral, and is one of the few rocks/minerals that we eat.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. It is not metamorphic.
  4. Halite is not a rock.

    No. Halite is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Halite is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, free
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The "strings" in a stalk of celery are made up of xylem and phloem. Which part of your body comes closest to serving the same function?

  1. Skeleton

    No. Your skeleton provides support and protection. In plants, the cell wall provides support and protection.
  2. Intestines

    No. Your intestines allow you to absorb nutrients from your food. Plants make their own food, so they do not need a digestive system.
  3. Nerves

    No. Your nerves carry signals to let the parts of your body communicate. They carry messages for your senses, to move your muscles, etc. Instead of having nerves, plants release chemicals that signal other parts of the plant.
  4. Blood Vessels

    Yes! Your blood vessels carry water and nutrients to different parts of your body. In plants, the xylem is made up of tubes that carry water and some nutrients from the roots upwards to other parts of the plant. The phloem is made up of tubes that carry the sugar produce by photosynthesis to other parts of the plant. While they work in very different ways, your blood vessels serve basically the same function (carrying water and nutrients) as the xylem and phloem in plants.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.1 Describe structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water and nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Seed Search video, free, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Testing a Leaf for Starch video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Smell the Flowers text page
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice
Review Plants-3 practice

SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support — some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons — while some plants have stems for support.
Bird Bones video
Reading a Skeleton video
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.d Relate the structure of organs to an organism’s ability to survive in a specific environment (e.g., hollow bird bones allow them to fly in air, hollow structure of hair insulates animals from hot or cold, dense root structure allows plants to grow in compact soil, fish fins aid fish in moving in water).
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Hunting with an Umbrella video, ClosedCaptions
Bendable Bones video
Calling a Woodpecker video
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, free, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
Microscopes: Making a Hay Infusion video, free, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Wet Mount video, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Dry Mount video, learnalong
901 photo challenge, free

This is a simple chart showing how energy flows through some of the parts of a food web. For example, the arrow from the grass to the grasshopper shows that the grasshopper gets it energy by eating the grass.

The hawk gets its energy by eating the water snake, but there is no arrow leading from the hawk. What should the arrow from the hawk point to>

  1. Egret

    No. The egret does not eat hawks.
  2. Carrion

    Yes! Carrion is dead animals. When the hawk eventually dies, flies will get their energy by eating the dead body. You could also draw arrows from all of the other animals to carrion.
  3. The Sun

    No. The Sun is not on the chart, and The Sun does not get its energy from the hawk.
  4. There should not be an arrow leading from the hawk.

    No. Energy cannot be destroyed. It always goes back into the system.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

SC.8.L.18.4 Cite evidence that living systems follow the Laws of Conservation of Mass and Energy.

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.