Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?

I used this piece of quartz to scratch a piece of glass. What was I testing?

  1. Streak

    No. To test streak, you rub the mineral on a white tile, to see its color when it is powdered.
  2. Fracture

    No. Fracture is one way that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.
  3. Hardness

    Yes. Hardness is measured by scratching other substances, such as your fingernail, copper, and glass. This quartz scratches the glass, which tells us it has a hardness or 5.5 or more. Actually, the hardness of quartz is 7, quite a bit harder than glass.
  4. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is one of the ways that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

The light area on the left side of this photo is the Milky Way. What is the Milky Way?

  1. A constellation.

    No. The Milky Way contains many more stars than a constellation.
  2. A solar system.

    No. A solar system only has one star, not a huge number of stars.
  3. A galaxy.

    Yes! Our solar system is part of the Milky Way galaxy. When we lived in the city, the lights made it difficult to see the Milky Way. Now that we live far from city lights, it is amazingly easy to see.
  4. A universe.

    No. The Milky Way is only a small part of the entire universe.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.1 Recognize that a galaxy consists of gas, dust, and many stars, including any objects orbiting the stars. Identify our home galaxy as the Milky Way.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-1 practice
Review Space-10 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.IV.1.c Compare the size of the Solar System to the size of the Milky Way galaxy.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

Science photo 718

Which of these is NOT a form of energy?

  1. Light

    No. Light is a form of kinetic energy.
  2. Thermal

    No. Thermal is a form of kinetic energy.
  3. Fire

    Yes. Fire is a chemical reaction that can produce forms of energy such as light, heat, and motion, but fire is NOT a form of energy.
  4. Motion

    No. Motion is a form of kinetic energy.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.3 Recognize that humans need resources found on Earth and that these are either renewable or nonrenewable.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

Utah

NGSS


4-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment.
Investigating Acid Rain video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
Review Energy-4 quest
Review Energy-1 practice

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.
Recycle video
Review Energy-4 quest

In the Yeast and Sugar video, I added different kinds of sugar to bottles with yeast and warm water. One of the bottles was a control. What should have been in that bottle?

  1. Just water

    No. With just water, you are removing two variables, the yeast and the sugar. You only want to remove the independent variable.
  2. Water and yeast

    Yes! A control should be exactly like the others, but without the independent variable (the variable you are changing in the experiment.) In this case, the variable you are changing is the kind of sugar, so the control should have everything except for the sugar.
  3. Water and sugar

    No. The yeast is not the independent variable, so leaving it out would not be correct.
  4. Water and salt

    No. Adding salt would be adding a new variable, which is not correct.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

This baby praying mantis looks very much like its mother, but not exactly. What does that tell us about its life cycle?

  1. It does not undergo metamorphosis.

    No. While it does look similar to its parents, it lacks wings and other features which it will have as an adult.
  2. It has incomplete metamorphosis.

    Yes! It has most of the features of an adult, and will gain the final adult features later in its life.
  3. It has complete metamorphosis.

    No. For complete metamorphosis, the larva looks very different from the parent.
  4. It skipped metamorphosis.

    No. While it does look similar to its parents, it lacks wings and other features which it will have as an adult.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.