Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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The Earth stays in orbit around the Sun because:

  1. The Sun's gravity pulls on the Earth

    This is only part of the answer.
  2. The Earth's gravity pulls on the Sun

    This is only part of the answer.
  3. The gravity of the Sun and the Earth pull on each other

    Yes! The gravitational attraction between the Earth and the Sun is a result of both the Sun pulling on the Earth and the Earth pulling on the Sun.
  4. Gravity does not keep the Earth in its orbit.

    No. Without the pull of gravity, the Earth would continue moving in a straight path instead of curving around the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.13.1 Identify familiar forces that cause objects to move, such as pushes or pulls, including gravity acting on falling objects.

SC.8.E.5.9 Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including: 1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction 2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of each body.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-12 practice

SC.6.P.13.2 Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.

Utah


UT.3.IV.2.c Pose questions about gravity and forces.

UT.6.III.3.a Describe the forces holding Earth in orbit around the sun, and the moon in orbit around Earth.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

Which part of your body comes closest to serving the same function as a plant's roots?

  1. Mouth

    Yes! The main functions for most plant roots is to anchor it in place and to take in water and nutrients from the soil. We do not need anything to anchor us in one place, but we use our mouth to take in water and nutrients.
  2. Feet

    No. A plants roots anchor into in place, keeping it from moving. Your feet do not do that.
  3. Lungs

    No. A plant takes in air through its leaves, not through its roots.
  4. Skeleton

    No. Your skeleton supports your body and protects your organs. In plants, this is done by the cell walls. The cell wall around each cell of a plant make it stiff, supporting stems, leaves, flowers, and other parts of the plant.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.1 Describe structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water and nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Pumpkin Guts video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Testing a Leaf for Starch video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Smell the Flowers text page
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.4.L.16.1 Identify processes of sexual reproduction in flowering plants, including pollination, fertilization (seed production), seed dispersal, and germination.
Pumpkin Guts video, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support — some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons — while some plants have stems for support.
Bird Bones video
Reading a Skeleton video
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.d Relate the structure of organs to an organism’s ability to survive in a specific environment (e.g., hollow bird bones allow them to fly in air, hollow structure of hair insulates animals from hot or cold, dense root structure allows plants to grow in compact soil, fish fins aid fish in moving in water).
Bendable Bones video
Calling a Woodpecker video
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Hunting with an Umbrella video, free, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
Microscopes: Making a Hay Infusion video, free, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Wet Mount video, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Dry Mount video, learnalong
901 photo challenge, free

I gave this balloon a negative electrostatic charge by rubbing it on my hair. Then I tore up bits of paper, and put them on the table. When I brought the balloon near them, they were attracted to the balloon. Why?

  1. The negative charge of the balloon induced a positive charge on the paper.

    Yes! The negative charge on the balloon pushes some of the negatively charged electrons in the paper to the far side, leaving the near side with a positive charge. Opposite charges attract, so the paper is attracted to the balloon.
  2. The negative charge of the balloon attracts the neutrally charged paper.

    No. As long as the paper is neutral, it will not be attracted or repelled.
  3. Tearing the paper gave it a positive charge.

    No. If the paper had a positive charge from being torn, the bits of paper with like charges would have repelled each other before you moved the balloon nearby.
  4. Paper is always attracted to balloons.

    No. This is easily tested by using a balloon that has not been rubbed on your hair. Without the positive charge, the paper is not attracted.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.10.3 Investigate and explain that an electrically-charged object can attract an uncharged object and can either attract or repel another charged object without any contact between the objects.

>>> Teacher Page: Electrostatic Charges


SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

Utah


UT.5.IV.1.c Describe the behavior of objects charged with static electricity in attracting or repelling without touching.

NGSS


MS-PS3-2 Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

Which of these is NOT an arthropod?


A: Horsefly

B: Fiddler Crab

C: Snail

D: Praying Mantis
  1. A: Horsefly

    No. Arthropods have an exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Like other insects, horseflies are arthropods.
  2. B: Fiddler Crab

    No. The Fiddler Crab has an exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. That tells us that they are arthropods.
  3. C: Snail

    Yes! The body of a snail is not segmented, an does not have any legs, much less jointed legs. It is NOT an arthropod. Instead, it belongs to a group of mollusks called gastropods.
  4. D: Praying Mantis

    No. The Praying Mantis has an exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Like other insects, a Praying Mantis is an arthropod.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.
Feathers video
A Walk in the Park video
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

SC.6.L.15.1 Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.3.b Use a simple classification system to classify unfamiliar Utah plants or animals (e.g., fish/amphibians/reptile/bird/mammal, invertebrate/vertebrate, tree/shrub/grass, deciduous/conifers).
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
A Walk in the Park video
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice
Review Classify-2 practice

UT.7.V.2.c Generalize rules for classification.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-3 practice
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice

NGSS

Are the ocean waves crashing against this rock an example of:

  1. Erosion

    Partially right! This is an example of erosion. Sand and bits of the rock are being moved by the waves..
  2. Weathering

    Partially right! This is an example of weathering too. Weathering is when a rock is broken into smaller pieces. The waves and the sand they carry are slowly grinding away these rocks.

  3. Both erosion and weathering

    Yes! The rock is being broken into smaller pieces by the waves (weathering), and the pieces are also being carried away by the waves (erosion).
  4. Neither erosion nor weathering

    No. Both weathering and erosion are happening here.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.2.b Distinguish between weathering (i.e., wearing down and breaking of rock surfaces) and erosion (i.e., the movement of materials).

UT.5.II.1.a Identify the objects, processes, or forces that weather and erode Earth’s surface (e.g., ice, plants, animals, abrasion, gravity, water, wind)

UT.8.III.2.b Describe the role of energy in the processes that change rock materials over time.
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong

NGSS


4-ESS2-1 Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.