Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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Which of the following is a difference between a meteor and a comet?

  1. Meteors are mostly made up of ice.

    No. Meteors are made up of rock or iron, Comets are mostly made up of ice.
  2. Only comets have a visible tail.

    No. A meteor is a meteoroid that has entered our atmosphere. As it burns, it also produces a tail.
  3. Meteors seem to move faster because they are closer.

    Yes. Meteors are entering our atmosphere, so they are much closer to us that a distant comet. That makes them seem to move much faster.
  4. Comets are smaller than meteors.

    No. Meteors are small, often the size of a grain of sand. Comets are much larger.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.3 Distinguish among the following objects of the Solar System – Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets – and identify Earth’s position in it.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.d Describe the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteors.
Review Space-3 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

The Common Raven is often a scavenger, but its beak is not strong enough to tear through the thick hide of a winter-killed deer.

It will sit near the carcass and call loudly, attracting other ravens. As the mob gathers, they start making distress calls. That usually attracts a large predator, such as a wolf or coyote. They wait until the predator tears into the carcass.

At that point, 3 or 4 of them will start harassing the predator, keeping its attention, while the other ravens steal parts of the carcass. They then share what they get with the ravens that kept the predator busy.

This is an example of what kind of relationship?

  1. mutualism

    Yes! In mutualism, both organisms benefit. The ravens help the predator find the carcass, and the predator tears it open so that the ravens can eat some too. Both get a benefit from the relationship.
  2. commensalism

    No. In commensalism, one organism benefits, and the other is not affected. In this case, the ravens and the predator both benefit.
  3. parasitism

    No. For parasitism, one organism benefits, and the other is harmed. Neither the raven nor the predator is harmed by this relationship.
  4. predation

    No. In predation, one organism eats another. Neither the raven nor the predator gets eaten in this relationship.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.L.17.2 Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms such as mutualism, predation, parasitism, competition, and commensalism.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice

NGSS


MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

These flowers are so long and thin that only hummingbirds can get to the nectar. What would be the advantage of only letting certain creatures get the nectar?

  1. It makes it more likely that the flower will be pollinated.

    Yes! As you can see in the Flowers video, the flower needs a pollinator to carry its pollen to another flower of the same kind. If only hummingbirds can get to the nectar, they are more likely to visit other flowers of the same kind. By doing that, they carry pollen from one flower to another, pollenating them. That makes this a strong advantage for the plant.
  2. It keeps animals from eating the nectar.

    No. The nectar is supposed to be eaten. It serves as a treat to get animals to come to the flower.
  3. It helps the hummingbirds get more food.

    No. While getting more food would be an advantage for the hummingbirds, it would not help the plant.
  4. There is no advantage.

    No. Flowers have specific shapes, colors, and smells for a reason.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.5.L.15.1 Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.7.L.15.3 Explore the scientific theory of evolution by relating how the inability of a species to adapt within a changing environment may contribute to the extinction of that species.

Utah


UT.4.V.2.b Cite examples of physical features that allow particular plants and animals to live in specific environments (e.g., duck has webbed feet, cactus has waxy coating).
Hunting with an Umbrella video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

UT.5.V.2.c Describe how a particular physical attribute may provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not in another (e.g., heavy fur in arctic climates keep animals warm whereas in hot desert climates it would cause overheating; flippers on such animals as sea lions and seals provide excellent swimming structures in the water but become clumsy and awkward on land; cacti retain the right amount of water in arid regions but would develop root rot in a more temperate region; fish gills have the ability to absorb oxygen in water but not on land).

UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.a Predict why certain traits (e.g., structure of teeth, body structure, coloration) are more likely to offer an advantage for survival of an organism.
Selective Smelling video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

This is common, table salt. Is it:

  1. a rock?

    Partly correct. Table salt, also known as halite, is both a rock and a mineral.
  2. a mineral?

    Partly correct. Table salt, also known as halite, is both a rock and a mineral.
  3. Both a rock and a mineral?

    Correct. Also known as halite, table salt fits the definition of a mineraland a rock.
  4. Neither a rock nor a mineral?

    No. Table salt, also known as halite, is both a rock and a mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

When you mix cornstarch and water, you get something that many science sites call Oobleck. Under pressure, it feels like a solid, but when the pressure is removed, it flows like a liquid. What state of matter is it?

Answer:

This is a mixture, made up of particles of solid matter surrounded by a liquid. The mixture is not a single state of matter.

This is an important concept to understand, and it is seen in many things we use every day. A good example is the Egg States video, showing how a mixture of liquid and gas can seem to be a solid.

Before you try to decide if something is solid, liquid, gas, plasma, or some other state of matter, first make sure that it is a pure substance, and not a mixture of different states.

Learn more about the science of cornstarch and water here.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.8.2 Identify objects and materials as solid, liquid, or gas.
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Air Space video
Teach It Right the First Time. text page, free
Review Matter-3 practice

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter

A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Air Space video
Air has Weight text page
Teach It Right the First Time. text page, free
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.8.P.8.1 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.
A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Expansion of Solids video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.2.a Identify the physical properties of matter (e.g., hard, soft, solid, liquid, gas).
A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Crushed Can video, checked
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice

NGSS

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.