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Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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I used this piece of quartz to scratch a piece of glass. What was I testing?

  1. Streak

    No. To test streak, you rub the mineral on a white tile, to see its color when it is powdered.
  2. Fracture

    No. Fracture is one way that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.
  3. Hardness

    Yes. Hardness is measured by scratching other substances, such as your fingernail, copper, and glass. This quartz scratches the glass, which tells us it has a hardness or 5.5 or more. Actually, the hardness of quartz is 7, quite a bit harder than glass.
  4. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is one of the ways that minerals can break. I am not breaking the mineral.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-1 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Which of the following is a vertebrate?


A: crab

B: starfish

C: fly

D: tadpole
  1. A: crab

    No. Crabs have an exoskeleton. They are arthropods, which are invertebrates.
  2. B: starfish

    No. Starfish do not have a vertebral column or a notochord. They are echinoderms, which are invertebrates.
  3. C: fly

    No. Flies have an exoskeleton. They are insects, which are invertebrates.
  4. D: tadpole

    Yes! Tadpoles are amphibians. They have an internal skeleton, which includes a vertebral column. They are vertebrates.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Feathers video, checked
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

SC.6.L.15.1 Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.3.b Use a simple classification system to classify unfamiliar Utah plants or animals (e.g., fish/amphibians/reptile/bird/mammal, invertebrate/vertebrate, tree/shrub/grass, deciduous/conifers).
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

UT.7.V.2.c Generalize rules for classification.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

NGSS

A lightning bolt has a huge amount of energy. Which of these kinds of energy is NOT a major component of lightning?

  1. Heat

    No. A lightning bolt can heat the air to over 30,000 °C (54,000 °F)
  2. Electrical

    No. A lightning bolt has a tremendous amount of electrical energy, often several hundred million volts, and several hundred thousand amperes.
  3. Sound

    No. Thunder, the sound energy produced by a lightning bolt, is so loud that it can often be heard up to ten miles away.
  4. Chemical

    Yes. While a lightning bolt can cause chemical changes, very little of the bolt's energy is converted to chemical energy.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.
The Singing Glass video, checked
Whistle Stick video, text page, blog, free, checked
Electrostatic Charges video
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-2 practice

SC.4.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.
The Singing Glass video, checked
Radioactive video, Updated, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
Electrostatic Charges video
Why Things Go Bang video
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Bean Power text page
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-2 practice

SC.5.P.10.1 Investigate and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, chemical, and mechanical.
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
The Singing Glass video, checked
Radioactive video, Updated, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
The Science of Pizza video, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
Why Things Go Bang video
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-2 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked

NGSS


4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.
Solar Power video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 1 video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 2 video, checked
Why Things Go Bang video
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
The Singing Glass video, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
The Science of Pizza video, checked
Heating a Balloon video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Simple Circuits video, checked
Doppler Effect video, checked
How Heat Moves video, checked
A Real Tuning Fork text page
Comparing How Sound Moves Through Liquids and Gases text page
Review Energy-2 practice

Which of the following observations is NOT scientifically testable?

  1. Butterflies have pretty wings.

    Yes! Pretty is an opinion, and can vary from person to person, so it is NOT scientifically testable.
  2. Butterflies have six legs.

    No. This could be tested by counting the legs of a variety of butterflies.
  3. Butterflies can sting like bees.

    No. A claim does not have to be true to be testable. Examination of a variety of butterflies would show that they do not have stingers.
  4. Most butterflies drink nectar from flowers.

    No. This could be tested by observing the feeding habits of butterflies.

Explain more about it.

If I said that butterflies did not have six legs, you could show me physical evidence by counting their legs. After counting the legs, the physical evidence would show that butterflies have six legs.

If I said that I don't think butterfly wings are pretty, you could show me wings that you think are pretty, but I might not agree with your opinion. "Pretty" is not something that we can measure. What is pretty to one person might not be pretty to another, so it is not a testable property.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.2.1 Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

SC.8.N.2.1 Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific ideas.

Utah

NGSS

I wanted to test different amounts of fertilizer to see which was best for growing grass. I mixed water with different amounts of fertilizer, and then added sodium polyacrylate to change it into a gel. Then I sprinkled the grass seeds on top, and waited for them to grow.

I really need a control group for this experiment. What would I use for a control?

  1. Water, fertilizer, and grass seed, without any sodium polyacrylate.

    No. For the control, we want to skip the thing we are testing for. We are not testing changes caused by the amount of sodium polyacrylate.
  2. Water, sodium polyacrylate, and grass seed, without any fertilizer.

    Yes! We are testing to see how different amounts of fertilizer change the growth of the grass. The amount of fertilizer is the variable we are testing, so the control group should not have any fertilizer.
  3. Water, sodium polyacrylate, and fertilizer, without any grass seed.

    No. For the control, we want to skip the thing we are testing for. We are not testing changes caused by the amount of grass seed, and we know that no grass will grow if we do not have any seeds.
  4. Sodium polyacrylate, fertilizer, and grass seed, without any water.

    No. For the control, we want to skip the thing we are testing for. We are not testing changes caused by the amount of water.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.