Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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The large, green stinkbug is drinking sap from this plant. That tells us that it is a:

  1. Producer.

    No. The plant is a producer. It captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. The stinkbug is eating the plant to get that energy.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    Yes! The stinkbug is eating the sap from the plant (a producer) to get the energy it contains.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. An animal that ate this stinkbug would be a secondary consumer.
  4. Decomposer

    No. Decomposers break down dead and decaying organisms. The plant that the stinkbug is eating is still alive and growing.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Measuring Photosynthesis video, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

Which planet is closest to the Earth?

  1. The Moon

    No. The Moon is not a planet.
  2. Mars

    Sometimes, but not always.
  3. Venus

    Sometimes, but not always.
  4. It varies with time.

    Yes. As the planets move around the Sun, their distance from the Earth varies. On different dates, the closest planet may be Mars, Venus, or Mercury.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.2 Recognize the major common characteristics of all planets and compare/contrast the properties of inner and outer planets.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-4 practice

SC.8.E.5.7 Compare and contrast the properties of objects in the Solar System including the Sun, planets, and moons to those of Earth, such as gravitational force, distance from the Sun, speed, movement, temperature, and atmospheric conditions.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-4 practice
Review Space-11 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.c Use models and graphs that accurately depict scale to compare the size and distance between objects in the solar system.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

This is the mineral galena. What type of luster does it have?

  1. Vitreous

    No. A vitreous luster means that the mineral looks glassy. Galena does not look like it is made of glass.
  2. Shiny

    No. Shiny is not a type of luster.
  3. Metallic

    Yes! A metallic luster means that the mineral looks like it is made of metal. Galena reflects light in the same way that a piece of metal does. If a mineral looks like it is made of metal, it has a metallic luster.
  4. Silver

    No. Silver is a color, not a type of luster. Luster is the way that a mineral reflects light, not is color.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-8 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice

Which of the following is NOT a function of your skeleton?

  1. Produce insulin

    Yes! Insulin is produced by the pancreas, not by bones.
  2. Work with muscles to help you move

    No. Your muscles attach to your bones. They work together to let you move.
  3. Protect internal organs

    No. Your skull protects your brain. Your ribs protect your heart and lungs. Your backbone protects your spinal cord.
  4. Produce blood cells.

    No. Your bone marrow produces your blood cells.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.14.1 Distinguish human body parts (brain, heart, lungs, stomach, muscles, and skeleton) and their basic functions.
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video, checked
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Review Anatomy-1 practice
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice

SC.5.L.14.1 Identify the organs in the human body and describe their functions, including the skin, brain, heart, lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, pancreas, muscles and skeleton, reproductive organs, kidneys, bladder, and sensory organs.
Bird Bones video, free
Kneesy, Earsy, Nosey video, checked
Bendable Bones video, checked
Just a Suggestion video
Reaction Time video
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Muscles Don't Push text page
Review Anatomy-1 practice
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice

SC.6.L.14.5 Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis.
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video, checked
Reaction Time video
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Muscles Don't Push text page
Review Anatomy-1 practice
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.2.c Relate the structure of an organ to its component parts and the larger system of which it is a part.
Reaction Time video
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Review Anatomy-1 practice
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-3 Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video, checked
Reaction Time video
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Review Anatomy-1 practice
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice

What season is the area that the arrow points to having?

  1. Winter

    Yes! Even though that area is in daylight, the Earth's axis in that hemisphere is pointing away from the Sun. It gets less direct light, and has shorter days.
  2. Spring

    No. For spring, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.
  3. Summer

    No. Although it is daytime in that area, the Earth's axis in that hemisphere is pointing away from the Sun. It gets less direct light, and has shorter days.
  4. Autumn

    No. For autumn, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.1 Observe that the patterns of stars in the sky stay the same although they appear to shift across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

Utah


UT.6.II.2.e Use a model to explain why the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video, checked
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

5-ESS1-2 Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Finding Your Way video, checked
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.