Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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Why is color not a reliable way to identify minerals?

  1. Many minerals occur in several different colors

    Yes. This is the mineral quartz. Quartz can be clear, white, black, yellow, purple, and other colors, so its color is not reliable for identification.
  2. It is difficult to tell the difference between color and luster.

    No. Luster tells us how the mineral reflects light, and has nothing to do with its color.
  3. Some minerals are clear, and don't have any color.

    No. Even clear minerals like quartz can be found in different colors due to impurities and imperfections.
  4. Actually, color is a good way to identify minerals.

    No. Color is not a reliable way to identify minerals.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Fireworks Colors video
Iron Cereal video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
A Cool Change text page
Acid Hunt text page
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Which of the following is a difference between a meteor and a comet?

  1. Meteors are mostly made up of ice.

    No. Meteors are made up of rock or iron, Comets are mostly made up of ice.
  2. Only comets have a visible tail.

    No. A meteor is a meteoroid that has entered our atmosphere. As it burns, it also produces a tail.
  3. Meteors seem to move faster because they are closer.

    Yes. Meteors are entering our atmosphere, so they are much closer to us that a distant comet. That makes them seem to move much faster.
  4. Comets are smaller than meteors.

    No. Meteors are small, often the size of a grain of sand. Comets are much larger.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.3 Distinguish among the following objects of the Solar System – Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets – and identify Earth’s position in it.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.d Describe the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteors.
Review Space-3 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

In testing this piece of quartz, I found that it would scratch glass. What property was I testing?

  1. Hardness

    Yes! Hardness is a substance's resistance to being scratched. With a hardness of 7, quartz is hard enough to scratch glass.
  2. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is the tendency of a mineral to break along planes of weakness to produce pieces with flat, smooth sides. Cleavage involves breaking, not scratching.
  3. Fracture

    No. Fracture is a property of minerals that do NOT break along planes of weakness to produce flat, smooth sides. This involves breaking, not scratching.
  4. Streak

    No. Streak is a test to see the color of a mineral when it is ground into a powder by scratching it on a porcelain streak plate. For streak, we are powdering the mineral, not scratching another substance.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS

While this spoon appears to have a broken handle, it is just the result of how the water affects the light. This is an example of:

  1. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light as it moves from one substance to another. As the light passes from the water to the air, its path is changed, making it appear that the spoon is broken.
  2. Reflection

    No. While some light is reflected from the glass, it is not responsible for the bending of the light.
  3. Absorption

    No. The water and glass are both clear, telling us that very little of the light is being absorbed. Absorption does not bend the light.
  4. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the image cloudy and blurry.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Looking for Rainbows video
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Onion Crystals video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.
About Microwaves video, checked
Microwave Chocolate video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
The Singing Glass video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
The Science of Pizza video, checked
Heating a Balloon video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Doppler Effect video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Noisy String video, checked
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Comparing How Sound Moves Through Liquids and Gases text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Sunprints video
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
About Microwaves video, checked
Microwave Chocolate video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Sunprints video
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

Which position would the Moon be in when it is a full moon?

  1. A

    No. This would be a half moon, with the half towards the Sun in light, and the half away from the Sun dark.
  2. B

    No. This would be a new moon. The entire lighted side of the Moon is facing away from the Earth, so the entire side of the Moon that we can see would be dark.
  3. C

    No. This would be a half moon, with the half towards the Sun in light, and the half away from the Sun dark.
  4. D

    Yes! The side of the Moon that is facing the Sun is also facing us. That entire side would be illuminated (unless the alignment was right for a lunar eclipse.)



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.