Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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I want to test a new fertilizer, to find the best concentration for my garden. To do this, I plan to divide my garden into four sections.

Section A. I will use 5 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section B. I will use 10 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section C. I will use 15 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

For section D, how much fertilizer per gallon should I use?

  1. 20 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  2. 30 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  3. 1 gram of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  4. No fertilizer at all.

    Yes. For this type of experiment, you need to have a control group. That is a group of test subjects that you do not do anything to. If the control group with no fertilizer grows just as well as the other groups, then I would know that the fertilizer was not working.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

I poured some water on this rock. Later that day, the water was all gone. What happened to it?

  1. It evaporated.

    Yes. When liquid water turns into water vapor, the process is called evaporation. That is what happened to the water on the rock.
  2. It sublimated.

    No. Sublimation is when a solid turns directly into a gas. Dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) is an example of sublimation. The solid changes directly into carbon dioxide gas, without becoming a liquid.
  3. It condensed.

    No. Condensation is when a gas turns into a liquid. The drops of water that form on the outside of a glass of ice is the result of condensation.
  4. It precipitated.

    No. In weather, precipitation is when solid or liquid water falls from the clouds. Rain, snow, and sleet are examples of precipitation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.9.1 Describe the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling by using familiar scientific terms such as melting, freezing, boiling, evaporation, and condensation.
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Making a Solar Still video
Wonderful Water video, checked
A Watched Pot video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
What Really Happens With Evaporation? text page, free, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.a Locate examples of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle (e.g., water evaporates when heated and clouds or dew forms when vapor is cooled).
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Experiment text page
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

This is the density column from the Making a Density Column video. Notice that the olives are floating at the boundary between the water and the corn syrup. What does that tell us?

  1. The olives are less dense than the water, and more dense than the corn syrup.

    No. If the olives were less dense than the water, they would float on top of the water layer.
  2. The water is denser than the olives.

    No. If the water was denser than the olives, then the olives would float on top of the water layer.
  3. The corn syrup is less dense than the olives.

    No. If the corn syrup was less dense than the olives, the olives would sink all the way to the bottom.
  4. Olives are denser than water, and less dense than corn syrup.

    Yes! Because the olives are denser than water, they sink to the bottom of the water layer. Because they are less dense than corn syrup, the olives float on top of the corn syrup layer.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.8.P.8.4 Classify and compare substances on the basis of characteristic physical properties that can be demonstrated or measured; for example, density, thermal or electrical conductivity, solubility, magnetic properties, melting and boiling points, and know that these properties are independent of the amount of the sample.
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Making Turmeric Paper video, checked
Testing for Tannic Acid video
Cartesian Diver video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Stale Bread video
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Candles in a Jar, part 2 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Candles in a Jar, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Review Matter-5 practice

Utah


UT.7.I.2.b Use observations to predict the relative density of various solids and liquids.

UT.7.I.2.d Describe the relationship between mass and volume as it relates to density.
Density: Ice, Oil, and Water video, checked
Cartesian Diver video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Floating Bubbles video, checked
Candles in a Jar, part 2 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Candles in a Jar, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Difference Between Weight and Mass video, checked
A Cup of Cold text page
Air has Weight text page
Fish in a Bucket text page
Review Matter-5 practice

NGSS

These cells DO NOT have a cell wall. What does that tell us?

  1. These are young cells.

    No. Even new cells can have a cell wall.
  2. These are NOT plant cells.

    Yes! Plant cells are surrounded by a cell wall, which provides structure and protection.
  3. These are NOT animal cells.

    No. Animal cells do not have a cell wall.
  4. These are dead cells.

    No. Being alive or dead does not change whether a cell has a cell wall or not.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.6.L.14.4 Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.1.c Differentiate between plant and animal cells based on cell wall and cell membrane.
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

What is the function of the fluffy, white part of the milkweed seed?

  1. It protects the seed from insects.

    No. Insects could easily eat the seed, even with the fluffy top.
  2. It helps hide the seeds from birds.

    No. The white fluff actually makes it easier for birds to find the seeds, but the moving air from their wings also helps spread the seeds.
  3. It gathers pollen.

    No. The seed has already been pollinated before the fluff develops.
  4. It causes the wind to spread the seeds.

    Yes! The fluffy part of the seed acts like a parachute to let the seeds blow long distances with the wind. This spreads the plant's seeds over a large area.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.