Quest: 8th Grade Science Assessment

Back to the SSA page.

Here are some science questions from the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Grade Standards to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



Which of the following is a difference between a meteor and a comet?

  1. Meteors are mostly made up of ice.

    No. Meteors are made up of rock or iron, Comets are mostly made up of ice.
  2. Only comets have a visible tail.

    No. A meteor is a meteoroid that has entered our atmosphere. As it burns, it also produces a tail.
  3. Meteors seem to move faster because they are closer.

    Yes. Meteors are entering our atmosphere, so they are much closer to us that a distant comet. That makes them seem to move much faster.
  4. Comets are smaller than meteors.

    No. Meteors are small, often the size of a grain of sand. Comets are much larger.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.3 Distinguish among the following objects of the Solar System – Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets – and identify Earth’s position in it.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.d Describe the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteors.
Review Space-3 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

I gave this balloon a negative electrostatic charge by rubbing it on my hair. Then I tore up bits of paper, and put them on the table. When I brought the balloon near them, they were attracted to the balloon. Why?

  1. The negative charge of the balloon induced a positive charge on the paper.

    Yes! The negative charge on the balloon pushes some of the negatively charged electrons in the paper to the far side, leaving the near side with a positive charge. Opposite charges attract, so the paper is attracted to the balloon.
  2. The negative charge of the balloon attracts the neutrally charged paper.

    No. As long as the paper is neutral, it will not be attracted or repelled.
  3. Tearing the paper gave it a positive charge.

    No. If the paper had a positive charge from being torn, the bits of paper with like charges would have repelled each other before you moved the balloon nearby.
  4. Paper is always attracted to balloons.

    No. This is easily tested by using a balloon that has not been rubbed on your hair. Without the positive charge, the paper is not attracted.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.10.3 Investigate and explain that an electrically-charged object can attract an uncharged object and can either attract or repel another charged object without any contact between the objects.

>>> Teacher Page: Electrostatic Charges


SC.6.P.13.1 Investigate and describe types of forces including contact forces and forces acting at a distance, such as electrical, magnetic, and gravitational.

Utah


UT.5.IV.1.c Describe the behavior of objects charged with static electricity in attracting or repelling without touching.

NGSS


MS-PS3-2 Develop a model to describe that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

Are the ocean waves crashing against this rock an example of:

  1. Erosion

    Partially right! This is an example of erosion. Sand and bits of the rock are being moved by the waves..
  2. Weathering

    Partially right! This is an example of weathering too. Weathering is when a rock is broken into smaller pieces. The waves and the sand they carry are slowly grinding away these rocks.

  3. Both erosion and weathering

    Yes! The rock is being broken into smaller pieces by the waves (weathering), and the pieces are also being carried away by the waves (erosion).
  4. Neither erosion nor weathering

    No. Both weathering and erosion are happening here.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.2.b Distinguish between weathering (i.e., wearing down and breaking of rock surfaces) and erosion (i.e., the movement of materials).

UT.5.II.1.a Identify the objects, processes, or forces that weather and erode Earth’s surface (e.g., ice, plants, animals, abrasion, gravity, water, wind)

UT.8.III.2.b Describe the role of energy in the processes that change rock materials over time.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong

NGSS


4-ESS2-1 Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.

Which of the following is a vertebrate?


A: crab

B: starfish

C: fly

D: tadpole
  1. A: crab

    No. Crabs have an exoskeleton. They are arthropods, which are invertebrates.
  2. B: starfish

    No. Starfish do not have a vertebral column or a notochord. They are echinoderms, which are invertebrates.
  3. C: fly

    No. Flies have an exoskeleton. They are insects, which are invertebrates.
  4. D: tadpole

    Yes! Tadpoles are amphibians. They have an internal skeleton, which includes a vertebral column. They are vertebrates.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.
Feathers video
A Walk in the Park video
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

SC.6.L.15.1 Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.3.b Use a simple classification system to classify unfamiliar Utah plants or animals (e.g., fish/amphibians/reptile/bird/mammal, invertebrate/vertebrate, tree/shrub/grass, deciduous/conifers).
A Walk in the Park video
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

UT.7.V.2.c Generalize rules for classification.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

NGSS

This is Halite, also known as table salt. It was formed when ancient seas dried up, leaving layers of salt behind. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. The Halite was not melted, and is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. Halite was deposited in large layers by water, which means that it is a sedimentary rock. Halite is also a mineral, and is one of the few rocks/minerals that we eat.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. It is not metamorphic.
  4. Halite is not a rock.

    No. Halite is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Halite is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.