Quest: 8th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Grade Standards to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



Cannonball Jelly fish are excellent swimmers, and Portly Spider Crabs often hitch a ride on them. What type of relationship is that?

  1. mutualism

    No. In mutualism, both organisms benefit. The jellyfish gets no benefit from the crab's hitchhiking.
  2. commensalism

    Yes. In commensalism, one organism (the crab) benefits, and the other (jellyfish) is not affected. The crab gets free transportation, and the jellyfish is not helped or harmed.
  3. parasitism

    No. For parasitism, one organism benefits, and the other is harmed. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish is harmed by this relationship.
  4. predation

    No. In predation, one organism eats another. Neither the crab nor the jellyfish gets eaten in this relationship.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.L.17.2 Compare and contrast the relationships among organisms such as mutualism, predation, parasitism, competition, and commensalism.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice

NGSS


MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.

The white lines in this piece of rock were straight when the formed. Later, the rock was squeezed by tremendous pressure that compressed the layers into squiggles. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. The original rock was igneous, but it has been changed and is no long an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are bits of other rocks that have been moved and deposited. This rock was squeezed, not moved and deposited. It is not sedimentary.
  3. Metamorphic

    Yes! Rocks that are changed by pressure and/or heat are classified as metamorphic rocks. The wavy, white lines show us that the rock has been squeezed by tremendous pressure. That tells us it is a metamorphic rock.
  4. None of the above.

    No. All rocks are classified as either igneous, sedimentary, or metamorphic.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.c Sort rocks by appearance according to the three basic types: sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic (e.g., sedimentary–rounded-appearing mineral and rock particles that are cemented together, often in layers; igneous–with or without observable crystals that are not in layers or with or without air holes or glasslike; metamorphic –crystals/minerals, often in layers).
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Review Rocks-10 practice

UT.4.III.1.d Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video, free
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video, free
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The nucleus of the cell contains most of the cell's DNA. Which other structure in the cell contains DNA?

  1. Mitochondria

    Yes! Your mitochondria have their own DNA. Unlike the DNA in the cell's nucleus, which is a mix of genes from your father and mother, all of your mitochondrial DNA comes from your mother.
  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum

    No. The endoplasmic reticulum is involved in the folding and movement of proteins in the cell.
  3. Chloroplast

    No. Chloroplasts contain chlorophyll, which is used in photosynthesis.
  4. Ribosome

    No. Ribosomes are parts of the cell that assemble proteins.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.6.L.14.4 Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Osmosis video
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

SC.7.L.16.1 Understand and explain that every organism requires a set of instructions that specifies its traits, that this hereditary information (DNA) contains genes located in the chromosomes of each cell, and that heredity is the passage of these instructions from one generation to another.

Utah


UT.7.IV.1.b Contrast the exchange of genetic information in sexual and asexual reproduction (e.g., number of parents, variation of genetic material).

NGSS


3-LS3-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Cells-4 practice

MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
Osmosis video
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

I want to test a new fertilizer, to find the best concentration for my garden. To do this, I plan to divide my garden into four sections.

Section A. I will use 5 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section B. I will use 10 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section C. I will use 15 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

For section D, how much fertilizer per gallon should I use?

  1. 20 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  2. 30 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  3. 1 gram of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  4. No fertilizer at all.

    Yes. For this type of experiment, you need to have a control group. That is a group of test subjects that you do not do anything to. If the control group with no fertilizer grows just as well as the other groups, then I would know that the fertilizer was not working.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

Why are trees an important part of the water cycle?

  1. Trees need water.

    No. While trees do need water, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  2. Transpiration

    Yes! In order to get nutrients up to the top of a tree, it has to let water evaporate from its leaves. This process is called transpiration. One tree can put hundreds of gallons of water into the air as water vapor every day.
  3. Trees help prevent erosion.

    No. While trees can help prevent erosion, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  4. Condensation

    No. Trees are not a major source of condensation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.2 Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states.

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle


SC.6.E.7.2 Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
The Water Cycle video
Weather and Climate video, free
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-9 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.b Describe the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation as they relate to the water cycle.

UT.4.I.2.c Identify locations that hold water as it passes through the water cycle (e.g., oceans, atmosphere, fresh surface water, snow, ice, and ground water).

NGSS


MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.