Quest: 8th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Grade Standards to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



When a scientist makes a new discovery, other scientists usually do exactly the same experiment. Why?

  1. They want to get part of the credit.

    No. While replicating an experiment is very important, the scientists who do it usually don't get much credit for their work unless they discover an error in the original experiment.
  2. Repetition is part of the scientific process.

    No. Repetition is when scientists repeat their own experiment several times, not when other scientists do the same experiment.
  3. They think they can make changes to improve the experiment.

    No. By doing exactly the same experiment, they are not changing anything. Instead, they are replicating the experiment as closely as possible.
  4. Replication is part of the scientific process.

    Yes. By replicating the experiment, other scientists can help verify that the results are accurate. There is always a possibility that there was some unnoticed influence on the original experiment, and replication can help spot that.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.N.1.4 Explain how particular scientific investigations should yield similar conclusions when repeated.

SC.5.N.2.2 Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.6.N.1.2 Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.

SC.7.N.1.2 Differentiate replication (by others) from repetition (multiple trials).

SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.

Utah

NGSS

Which part of the food web does this mushroom fit into?

  1. Producer.

    No. A producer captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. To do that, the organism needs to contain chlorophyll. This mushroom cannot use the energy of sunlight to produce its own food.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    No. Primary consumers eat producers. This mushroom does not eat living plants.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. This mushroom does not eat living animals.
  4. Decomposer

    Yes! Decomposers break down dead and decaying organisms. This mushroom gets its energy from decaying organisms in the soil.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
What is a Food Web? text page
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
What is a Food Web? text page
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

This is called Fluorite. It is used in making many important chemicals. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. Fluorite is sometimes found as a mineral in igneous rock, but it is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. Fluorite is not a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. Fluorite is not metamorphic.
  4. Fluorite is not a rock.

    Yes! Fluorite is a mineral, not a rock. It is not found in large layers in the Earth.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

This is called Quartzite. It was once sandstone, but heat and pressure changed it by fusing the grains of sand to each other, making it much harder. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. That would have melted the sand grains. This is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. When it was sandstone it was a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    Yes!. This quartzite been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. It is metamorphic.
  4. Quartzite is not a rock.

    No. Quartzite is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Quartzite is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Which organ produces bile to digest the fat in this bacon?

  1. Liver

    Yes! The liver produces bile, which digests fats.
  2. Gall Bladder

    No. The gall bladder stores the bile, but does not produce it.
  3. Pancreas

    No. The pancreas produces insulin to digest sugar.
  4. Thyroid

    No. The thyroid produces several hormones which control growth and metabolism, but it does not produce bile.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.14.1 Distinguish human body parts (brain, heart, lungs, stomach, muscles, and skeleton) and their basic functions.
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video
Reading a Skeleton video, free
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice
Review Anatomy-1 practice

SC.5.L.14.1 Identify the organs in the human body and describe their functions, including the skin, brain, heart, lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, pancreas, muscles and skeleton, reproductive organs, kidneys, bladder, and sensory organs.

SC.6.L.14.5 Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis.
Reading a Skeleton video, free
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video
Reaction Time video
Muscles Don't Push text page
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice
Review Anatomy-1 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.2.c Relate the structure of an organ to its component parts and the larger system of which it is a part.

NGSS


MS-LS1-3 Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
Bird Bones video, free
Bendable Bones video
Reaction Time video
Reading a Skeleton video, free
Review Anatomy-2 practice
Review Anatomy-3 practice
Review Anatomy-1 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.