Quest: 5th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Standards for Grades 2-5 to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

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This is the mineral galena. What type of luster does it have?

  1. Vitreous

    No. A vitreous luster means that the mineral looks glassy. Galena does not look like it is made of glass.
  2. Shiny

    No. Shiny is not a type of luster.
  3. Metallic

    Yes! A metallic luster means that the mineral looks like it is made of metal. Galena reflects light in the same way that a piece of metal does. If a mineral looks like it is made of metal, it has a metallic luster.
  4. Silver

    No. Silver is a color, not a type of luster. Luster is the way that a mineral reflects light, not is color.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.

Utah


UT.4.III.1.b Observe rocks using a magnifying glass and draw shapes and colors of the minerals.

UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).

NGSS


5-PS1-3 Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

This layer of rock contains fossilized tracks from a dinosaur (Dilophosaurus). The black object is my cell phone for size reference. What kind of rock is it?

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. An igneous rock would not have fossilized dinosaur tracks.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. The presence of fossils is one of the indications that a rock is probably sedimentary.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. The metamorphic process would have destroyed the tracks.
  4. It is not rock.

    No. These dinosaur tracks are in rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.d Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

UT.8.III.1.c Categorize rock samples as sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Which of the following is a difference between a meteor and a comet?

  1. Meteors are mostly made up of ice.

    No. Meteors are made up of rock or iron, Comets are mostly made up of ice.
  2. Only comets have a visible tail.

    No. A meteor is a meteoroid that has entered our atmosphere. As it burns, it also produces a tail.
  3. Meteors seem to move faster because they are closer.

    Yes. Meteors are entering our atmosphere, so they are much closer to us that a distant comet. That makes them seem to move much faster.
  4. Comets are smaller than meteors.

    No. Meteors are small, often the size of a grain of sand. Comets are much larger.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.3 Distinguish among the following objects of the Solar System – Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, comets – and identify Earth’s position in it.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.d Describe the characteristics of comets, asteroids, and meteors.
Review Space-3 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

What season is the area that the arrow points to having?

  1. Winter

    No. In winter, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be pointed away from the Sun.
  2. Spring

    No. For spring, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.
  3. Summer

    Yes! Even though that area is experiencing night, the Southern hemisphere is pointed towards the Sun. That means that it gets more direct sunlight and longer days.
  4. Autumn

    No. For autumn, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.1 Observe that the patterns of stars in the sky stay the same although they appear to shift across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

Utah


UT.6.II.2.e Use a model to explain why the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

5-ESS1-2 Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Finding Your Way video
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

Which of the following observations is NOT scientifically testable?

  1. Butterflies have pretty wings.

    Yes! Pretty is an opinion, and can vary from person to person, so it is NOT scientifically testable.
  2. Butterflies have six legs.

    No. This could be tested by counting the legs of a variety of butterflies.
  3. Butterflies can sting like bees.

    No. A claim does not have to be true to be testable. Examination of a variety of butterflies would show that they do not have stingers.
  4. Most butterflies drink nectar from flowers.

    No. This could be tested by observing the feeding habits of butterflies.

Explain more about it.

If I said that butterflies did not have six legs, you could show me physical evidence by counting their legs. After counting the legs, the physical evidence would show that butterflies have six legs.

If I said that I don't think butterfly wings are pretty, you could show me wings that you think are pretty, but I might not agree with your opinion. "Pretty" is not something that we can measure. What is pretty to one person might not be pretty to another, so it is not a testable property.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.2.1 Recognize and explain that science is grounded in empirical observations that are testable; explanation must always be linked with evidence.

SC.8.N.2.1 Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific ideas.

Utah

NGSS


The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.