Quest: 5th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Standards for Grades 2-5 to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



Why are trees an important part of the water cycle?

  1. Trees need water.

    No. While trees do need water, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  2. Transpiration

    Yes! In order to get nutrients up to the top of a tree, it has to let water evaporate from its leaves. This process is called transpiration. One tree can put hundreds of gallons of water into the air as water vapor every day.
  3. Trees help prevent erosion.

    No. While trees can help prevent erosion, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  4. Condensation

    No. Trees are not a major source of condensation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.2 Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states.
Ice Cream Science video, checked
75% Water video, checked
Crushed Can video, checked
A Boat Full of Holes video, checked
A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
Water on a String video, blog, ClosedCaptions
Wonderful Water video, checked
A Watched Pot video
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
Adding to a Full Cup text page
What Really Happens With Evaporation? text page, free, checked
A Clean Trick text page
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.6.E.7.2 Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
Weather and Climate video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-9 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.b Describe the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation as they relate to the water cycle.
Making a Solar Still video
Wonderful Water video, checked
A Watched Pot video
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Experiment text page
What Really Happens With Evaporation? text page, free, checked
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

UT.4.I.2.c Identify locations that hold water as it passes through the water cycle (e.g., oceans, atmosphere, fresh surface water, snow, ice, and ground water).
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
75% Water video, checked
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.
Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Making a Solar Still video
Wonderful Water video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

I poured some water on this rock. Later that day, the water was all gone. What happened to it?

  1. It evaporated.

    Yes. When liquid water turns into water vapor, the process is called evaporation. That is what happened to the water on the rock.
  2. It sublimated.

    No. Sublimation is when a solid turns directly into a gas. Dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) is an example of sublimation. The solid changes directly into carbon dioxide gas, without becoming a liquid.
  3. It condensed.

    No. Condensation is when a gas turns into a liquid. The drops of water that form on the outside of a glass of ice is the result of condensation.
  4. It precipitated.

    No. In weather, precipitation is when solid or liquid water falls from the clouds. Rain, snow, and sleet are examples of precipitation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.9.1 Describe the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling by using familiar scientific terms such as melting, freezing, boiling, evaporation, and condensation.
Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Making a Solar Still video
Wonderful Water video, checked
A Watched Pot video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
What Really Happens With Evaporation? text page, free, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle

Cloud Formation, part 2 video
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Photographing Snowflakes video, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.a Locate examples of evaporation and condensation in the water cycle (e.g., water evaporates when heated and clouds or dew forms when vapor is cooled).
Cloud Types video
Making a Solar Still video
A Watched Pot video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
The Water Cycle video, checked
A Model of the Water Cycle video, ClosedCaptions, checked
A Cool Experiment text page
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video, checked
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

When water freezes into ice, its volume increases. What happens to its mass?

  1. It increases.

    No. When water freezes, it takes up more space, but the mass stays the same.
  2. It stays the same.

    Yes. When water freezes, it expands to take up more space, but its mass stays the same. Mass is the measure of how much "stuff" is there. Freezing water does not create new water or add more "stuff". It just makes the water take up more space.
  3. It decreases.

    No. The mass stays the same, even when the water freezes.
  4. Water does not have mass.

    No. Everything that is made out of matter has mass.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.3 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating that the mass of a whole object is always the same as the sum of the masses of its parts.

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter

A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Air Space video
Air has Weight text page
Teach It Right the First Time. text page, free
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.8.P.9.1 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating and concluding that mass is conserved when substances undergo physical and chemical changes.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.1.b Compare the weight of a specified quantity of matter before and after it undergoes melting or freezing.
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Review Matter-2 practice

UT.7.I.2.a Use appropriate instruments to determine mass and volume of solids and liquids and record data.
Review Matter-2 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-2 Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
The Difference Between Weight and Mass video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Air has Weight text page
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

This is the Navajo Sandstone, a huge layer of rock that forms the cliff in our back yard. The strange patterns in the sandstone tell us that at the time they were formed, this area was a desert, and the sand formed sand dunes. What kind of rock is sandstone?

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks are formed from molten lava or magma, not from sand.
  2. Sedimentary

    Yes! Sedimentary rocks are made up of bits of other rocks that have been deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity. This sand was deposited by the wind, making this a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    No. Metamorphic rocks have been changed by heat and/or pressure. If this sandstone was exposed to tremendous heat and pressure, it could change into a metamorphic rock called quartzite.
  4. Sandstone is not a rock.

    No. Sandstone is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. It is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.d Classify common rocks found in Utah as sedimentary (i.e., sandstone, conglomerate, shale), igneous (i.e., basalt, granite, obsidian, pumice) and metamorphic (i.e., marble, gneiss, schist).
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

UT.8.III.1.c Categorize rock samples as sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Which part of your body comes closest to serving the same function as a flower?

  1. Sensory organs

    No. Plants can sense their surrounds just as well without flowers.
  2. Reproductive organs

    Yes! Flowers are the reproductive organs of the plant. While most animals are either male or female, most flowers have both male (stamen) and female (pistil) reproductive organs. In this photograph, the male stamens are the green stalks with the yellow ends. The female pistil is the white structure just below the stamens.
  3. Digestive system

    No. Plants make their own food, so they do not need a digestive system.
  4. Skeletal system

    No. The stiff cell wall of a plant cell serves the same function as our skeleton.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.1 Describe structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water and nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Measuring Photosynthesis video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Testing a Leaf for Starch video, ClosedCaptions
Smell the Flowers text page
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice
Review Plants-3 practice

SC.4.L.16.1 Identify processes of sexual reproduction in flowering plants, including pollination, fertilization (seed production), seed dispersal, and germination.
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support — some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons — while some plants have stems for support.
Bird Bones video, free
Reading a Skeleton video, free, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.d Relate the structure of organs to an organism’s ability to survive in a specific environment (e.g., hollow bird bones allow them to fly in air, hollow structure of hair insulates animals from hot or cold, dense root structure allows plants to grow in compact soil, fish fins aid fish in moving in water).
Onion Crystals video
Hunting with an Umbrella video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Bendable Bones video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
Microscopes: Making a Hay Infusion video, free, learnalong, checked
Microscopes: Making a Wet Mount video, learnalong, checked
Microscopes: Making a Dry Mount video, learnalong, checked
901 photo challenge, free

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.