Quest: 5th Grade Science Assessment

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Here are some science questions from the Standards for Grades 2-5 to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



From our new home in Utah, the stars are so bright that we can even see the Milky Way Galaxy. How far is the Milky Way Galaxy from Earth?

  1. 923 light years.

  2. 92.3 light years.

  3. 9.23 light years.

  4. We are in the Milky Way Galaxy.

Think about it, and when you think you know the answer, then continue.

The Sun and you and me and all the stars that we can see are in the galaxy we call the Milky Way.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.1 Recognize that a galaxy consists of gas, dust, and many stars, including any objects orbiting the stars. Identify our home galaxy as the Milky Way.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-1 practice
Review Space-10 practice

SC.8.E.5.1 Recognize that there are enormous distances between objects in space and apply our knowledge of light and space travel to understand this distance.
Sunprints video
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, free, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video
A Color You Can't See video, free
How Far is That Planet? text page, free
CD Spectrum text page
Review Space-1 practice
Review Light-3 practice

Utah


UT.6.IV.1.d Compare the size of the Milky Way galaxy to the size of the known universe.
Review Space-1 practice

NGSS


2-LS2-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.

These are the four stages of a mealworm's life cycle. What kind of life cycle is it?

  1. Incomplete metamorphosis

    No. For an incomplete metamorphosis, there are only three stages: egg, larva, and adult. The young also look very similar to the adults. The mealworm larva looks very different from the beetle.
  2. Complete metamorphosis.

    Yes! For a complete metamorphosis, the animal goes through four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.
  3. Full metamorphosis.

    No. There is no life cycle called full metamorphosis.
  4. Partial metamorphosis.

    No. There is no life cycle called partial metamorphosis.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Which part of your body comes closest to serving the same function as a plant's roots?

  1. Mouth

    Yes! The main functions for most plant roots is to anchor it in place and to take in water and nutrients from the soil. We do not need anything to anchor us in one place, but we use our mouth to take in water and nutrients.
  2. Feet

    No. A plants roots anchor into in place, keeping it from moving. Your feet do not do that.
  3. Lungs

    No. A plant takes in air through its leaves, not through its roots.
  4. Skeleton

    No. Your skeleton supports your body and protects your organs. In plants, this is done by the cell walls. The cell wall around each cell of a plant make it stiff, supporting stems, leaves, flowers, and other parts of the plant.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.1 Describe structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water and nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Testing a Leaf for Starch video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Smell the Flowers text page
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.4.L.16.1 Identify processes of sexual reproduction in flowering plants, including pollination, fertilization (seed production), seed dispersal, and germination.
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support — some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons — while some plants have stems for support.
Bird Bones video, free
Reading a Skeleton video, free
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.d Relate the structure of organs to an organism’s ability to survive in a specific environment (e.g., hollow bird bones allow them to fly in air, hollow structure of hair insulates animals from hot or cold, dense root structure allows plants to grow in compact soil, fish fins aid fish in moving in water).
Hunting with an Umbrella video, free, ClosedCaptions
Bendable Bones video
Calling a Woodpecker video
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
Microscopes: Making a Hay Infusion video, free, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Wet Mount video, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Dry Mount video, learnalong
901 photo challenge, free

Why are trees an important part of the water cycle?

  1. Trees need water.

    No. While trees do need water, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  2. Transpiration

    Yes! In order to get nutrients up to the top of a tree, it has to let water evaporate from its leaves. This process is called transpiration. One tree can put hundreds of gallons of water into the air as water vapor every day.
  3. Trees help prevent erosion.

    No. While trees can help prevent erosion, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  4. Condensation

    No. Trees are not a major source of condensation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.2 Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states.

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle


SC.6.E.7.2 Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.

Utah


UT.4.I.2.b Describe the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation as they relate to the water cycle.

UT.4.I.2.c Identify locations that hold water as it passes through the water cycle (e.g., oceans, atmosphere, fresh surface water, snow, ice, and ground water).

NGSS


MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

This is called Quartzite. It was once sandstone, but heat and pressure changed it by fusing the grains of sand to each other, making it much harder. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. That would have melted the sand grains. This is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. When it was sandstone it was a sedimentary rock.
  3. Metamorphic

    Yes!. This quartzite been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. It is metamorphic.
  4. Quartzite is not a rock.

    No. Quartzite is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Quartzite is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.